In vagus research, the long-term odds just went up

By GREGORY ZELLER // The latest bioelectronics breakthrough from the Feinstein Institutes for Medical Research is a long story. Literally. But it’s a good one: For the first time, electric vagus nerve stimulation – usually tested through one-off zapping experiments – has been delivered through long-term implants. And the results are more than promising, according to researchers who implanted the left cervical vagus nerve of four laboratory mice with “bipolar cuff electrodes” (know your microprobes,…

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Sound investments, on an Island filled with Wonder

 By TOM MARINER // A “blast from the past” from your most recent newsletter: A few years after Ray Kurzweil introduced the first Reading Machine, he cranked out his first “music synthesizer” with Stevie Wonder – a product of Kurzweil’s fertile brain and (in theory) a bet between the two that electronic stuff could not sound like a concert grand piano. The technical challenge was that large memory chips that digitally hold millions of pieces…

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A simple code for collegians: programming for all

By MATTHEW WRIGHT // Has higher education gone soft on coding? Isolated in our computer science departments, it’s not reaching the wider student audience I believe it should. At Adelphi University, where I chair the Physics Department, teaching coding to all students – STEM majors, humanities majors and health-profession majors – is an experiment I have tried and have personally seen succeed. Computer programming is in high demand in the workplace, and it’s a 21st…

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