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No: 365: Electrons, hackathons, gadget gifts and yes, America, there is a climate change

  Golden mettle: Congratulations, dear reader – you’ve reached the 50th Friday of 2018 (go ahead and count, if you don’t believe us) and the end of another busy week of socioeconomic innovation. You are to be commended. It’s Dec. 14 out there, and we have plenty of interesting days to choose from – it’s international Monkey Day and, here in the USA, National Salesperson Day. Because it just sounds so badass: But we’re going…


No. 336: Beer, legalized marijuana, supermodels and a three-day weekend. You’re welcome.

Labor of love: Glory be and welcome to Friday, dear readers – and not just any Friday, but (for most of us) the start of a glorious three-day holiday weekend, marking (unofficially) the end of the Summer of 2018. It’s Aug. 31, the last Friday in August, to be followed promptly by the first Monday in September – and the 124th observance of Labor Day since it became a federal holiday in 1894. Programming note:…


No. 304: The Piano Man ages, the yacht club sets a new course and Feinstein’s codebreakers show some real nerve

Happy National Bike to School Day: And a glorious National School Nurse Day to you, dear readers, part of what we trust is a peaceful and joyous National School Nurse Week. It’s May 9, 2018, and together we’re hurdling the hump of another busy week of Long Island socioeconomic progress. Drawing board: We come to you today on the 264th anniversary of a truly noteworthy innovation – the very first newspaper political cartoon, which appeared…


No. 302: Inventor-palooza at SBU, drones in the Mohawk Valley and why Long Island’s Craft Beer Week will fill bellies with more than brew

You certainly May: Enough with the Marching like a lion and the April showers (and April snow, for the matter) – it’s May and time for the good stuff. The weather people say 80 degrees all over Long Island today. Rejoice. It’s May 2, to be exact, and the midpoint of another exciting week in Long Island socioeconomic innovation. Welcome new newsletter subscribers Paul, Evan, Kerry, Krista, Rick and Paolo – you’re just in time…


No. 300: Anniversary edition, starring Shakespeare, Dutch Reagan and Academy Award-winner Jessica Lange (and introducing Vengo)

An imperfect 300: Welcome, friends, to your latest Innovate LI newsletter, and not just any Innovate LI newsletter, but the 300th since founder John Kominicki e-blasted the first more than three years ago. That’s a lot of historical anecdotes, celebrity birthdays, regional shout-outs, hyperlinks, funding reports and Stuff We’re Reading. And we wanted to do something truly spectacular to recognize our tercentenary edition. So, we came up with… Suggested serving: These foods/serving sizes all contain…


No. 299: On ‘natural marijuana,’ (unrelated) reef madness, the patient experience and the myth of the innovation lab

Turning point: Welcome to Wednesday, dear readers, and the midpoint of another productive week in Long Island socioeconomic innovation. A special hello to freshly minted newsletter subscribers David, Nina, Mark, Pam and Franco. Welcome to the show, please keep your safety belt fastened at all times. It’s April 18 out there: And happy anniversary to Stars and Stripes, the U.S. military newspaper – and one-time home of an eager young cub named Kominicki – that…


No. 264: Tribute to a friend

The outpouring of affection and well-wishes that followed the passing of Innovate LI founder and Publisher John Kominicki is deeply appreciated. We loved him, too. We’ll remember the humor, the wit, the generosity of spirit, the innovative vision. And we’ll especially remember the work ethic, which reminds us that time – and newsletters – stop for no man. So keep those story suggestions, calendar items and other new-economy tips coming at editor@innovateli.com. Anyone who knew…


No. 247: Real fake news, 3-D bodies and has 43North gone south?

TG it’s F: A happy Friday, everybody. There’s still time to enjoy what’s left of the Harvest Moon. And, of course, Neil Young. Making copies: Electric photography, now better known as photocopying, was patented by law student Chester Carlson on this day in 1941. His partner, the Haloid Co., later changed its name to Xerox Corp. And worth noting: “Something,” George Harrison’s first song to rate the A side of a Beatles 45, was released today in 1969. After “Yesterday,” it’s the most-covered Beatles song….


No. 242: CEO comp, ash-boring beetles and meet Hubert the Humanoid

TG it’s F: The last week of summer is upon us. Oh, and today is National Double Cheeseburger Day. Please celebrate responsibly. Today’s birthday duo: Two guys who loved pasta – Marco Polo and William Howard Taft. The rich get richer: Median pay for CEOs of Russell 3000 firms was $3.8 million last year, up 5.9 percent from 2015. CEOs of S&P 500 firms earned a median of $11.5 million, up 6.3 percent, according to…


No. 235: Hedy Lamarr, a healthy heart protein and ‘stay young’ is the tech world’s oldest adage

TG it’s F: Happy Friday, everybody. It’s National Presidential Joke Day. I know what you’re thinking. Actually, the observance dates back to Ronald Reagan’s 1984 gaffe in which he said into a live mic, “My fellow Americans, I’m pleased to tell you today that I’ve signed legislation that will outlaw Russia forever. We begin bombing in five minutes.” (We suspect there’s a similar yearning among current White House lawyers.) On this day in 1942: Film…


No. 233: Startup help, surefire hangover cures and one small theft for Neil Armstrong

TG it’s F:  It’s Aug. 4, on which Elvis released “Hound Dog,” “Purple Rain” hit No. 1 and Glory Hoskin received a patent for the talking potty. (Several messages, no joke, started with, “Hey, Big Boy …”) The week’s big number: Warren Buffet’s Berkshire Hathaway made $1,036,000,000 on Wednesday in the Apple stock run up. WHAT’S NEWS Cavity search: SBU’s dental school is one of five selected to pilot a digital dentistry program developed by the Chicago-based American College of…


No. 230: Jeff Meyer, Kathy Ross and Snooty, plus Hicksville’s Alyssa Iryami and Audrey Shine shine

TG it’s W: A happy midweek everybody, and welcome new readers Howard, Sophia, Josh, James, Genevieve, Johanna, Bob, Rorrie, Nancy, Ellen, John, Dan and Kevin. Passed: Satoshi Ozaki, who cemented key international collaborations in high-energy and nuclear physics and helped design and build accelerators for scientific research on two continents – including two at Brookhaven National Laboratory – died Saturday. He was 88. Somewhat less accomplished, but still loved: Snooty, the world’s oldest known manatee, died Sunday, days after his 69th birthday,…


No. 229: Cybersecurity, doggone history and several fairly interesting things going on with bugs

Halfway home: A happy Wednesday, everybody, and how about a heartfelt Innovate welcome to new readers Holly, Mica, Jose, Gary, Amy, Briley and Anna. Great to have you aboard, kids. It’s July 19, on which musicians Alan Gorrie, Bernie Leadon, Brian May and Alan Collins were born. Can you name their bands? Answers after the news. Extra credit: George Frayne. Top o’ the Innovate LI site: Re-Nuble Inc., the Tinia Pina startup that turns food waste into fresh produce,…


No. 228: Sleep at your desk, promising T-Cell therapy and Elvis has left the brewery

Happy Friday: Freed slave and entrepreneur Sarah Goode became the first African American woman to receive a patent on this day, in 1885. Her invention combined a fully functioning roll-top desk with a full-length bed. (Assembled by her husband, Archibald, a carpenter and self-described “stair builder.”) MP3 code formatting was formally christened on this date in 1995, giving sound engineers compression rates of 90 percent and up. Previously, the average home computer didn’t have enough storage for the music…


No. 227: Gail Simmons, Jim Simons and we somehow missed the most expensive housing list

It’s Wednesday: A happy midweek, everybody, and welcome new readers Tutty, Alice, Serge, Pete and Lillian. Jolly Green Giant Great Big Tender Peas were trademarked on this day in 1927. Zeppo Marx – the unfunny one – received a patent for a cardiac pulse rate monitor. Reading? Check: Long Island billionaire Jim Simons and his wife Marilyn have donated $25 million to the New York Public Library, one of the institution’s largest-ever gifts. The money…