Health

Tracey, global team unearth new bioelectronic clue

By GREGORY ZELLER // An international research team featuring one of Long Island’s great innovators has uncovered a potential key to fighting viral infections – a bioelectronic-medicine breakthrough with wide-ranging implications for a multitude of patients and conditions. Feinstein Institute for Medical Research President and CEO Kevin Tracey, a global electronic nerve-stimulation and bioelectronic medicine pioneer, joined with scientists from Canada, Europe and Asia to research and announce the new findings, detailed in an article…

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NIH to Feinstein: Stick out that chest (bioelectrically)

By GREGORY ZELLER // With new treatments for obesity, heart failure and a host of other conditions in sight, a Feinstein Institute researcher will zero in on specific abdominal targets in a new “precision bioelectronic medicine” study. North Shore University Hospital and Long Island Jewish Medical Center Chief of Gastroenterology Larry Miller, who also directs the Gastroenterology Laboratory at the Feinstein Institute for Medical Research, has received a $1.4 million National Institutes of Health grant…


Feinstein researchers eye chronic post-storm despair

By GREGORY ZELLER // A team of Feinstein Institute for Medical Research investigators is digging deep into the mental toll natural disasters take on survivors. The team – led by Rebecca Schwartz, an associate investigator at the Manhasset-based Feinstein Institute, R&D division of the Northwell Health system – presented its findings during a roundtable discussion at the American Public Health Association’s annual meeting, held this week in California. According to the research, exposure to natural…


Researchers eye genetic factors in schizophrenia drugs

By GREGORY ZELLER // A new study by Feinstein Institute for Medical Research scientists suggests that a patient’s response to antipsychotic pharmaceuticals can be predicted by genetic predispositions. Schizophrenia – characterized by delusions, hallucinations and disorganized thoughts – is one of the leading causes of disability in the United States. Antipsychotic pharmaceuticals are a common treatment option, but such therapies are often “given without guidance from lab tests to show effectiveness, as is common in…


The future of heart surgery, in the palm of his hand

By GREGORY ZELLER // A Stony Brook University biomedical engineering professor has been tasked with optimizing a cutting-edge treatment that brings new hope to patients suffering from a serious heart disorder. Aortic stenosis, wherein the valves of the heart don’t fully open, has long been a bane of the cardiology community, which has historically resorted to risky open-heart valve-replacement surgery or simply deemed aortic stenosis patients inoperable. But in recent years, transcatheter aortic valve replacement…


Northwell backs California co.’s bloody good AI tech

By GREGORY ZELLER // Impressed by what it’s seen so far, Northwell Health is betting heavily on an artificial intelligence-fueled digital-imaging technology that monitors blood loss during surgical procedures. California-based Gauss Surgical, an AI-driven healthcare technology company, has raised $20 million in a Series C funding round led by the New Hyde Park-based health system and SoftBank Ventures Korea, the global early-stage venture-capital arm of SoftBank Group, a Japanese multinational holding conglomerate. The funding round…


At Stony Brook University Hospital, enter Sands man

By GREGORY ZELLER // An expert in high-risk medicine has been tapped as the new chief medical officer of Stony Brook University Hospital. Mark Sands, who most recently served as enterprise associate chief quality officer for the Cleveland Clinic Foundation, is SBUH’s new top doc, the hospital announced Monday. His appointment as chief medical officer officially kicks off Nov. 1. Sands – who earned his bachelor’s of science and medical degrees from Northwestern University and…