Newsletters

No. 300: Anniversary edition, starring Shakespeare, Dutch Reagan and Academy Award-winner Jessica Lange (and introducing Vengo)

An imperfect 300: Welcome, friends, to your latest Innovate LI newsletter, and not just any Innovate LI newsletter, but the 300th since founder John Kominicki e-blasted the first more than three years ago. That’s a lot of historical anecdotes, celebrity birthdays, regional shout-outs, hyperlinks, funding reports and Stuff We’re Reading. And we wanted to do something truly spectacular to recognize our tercentenary edition. So, we came up with… Suggested serving: These foods/serving sizes all contain…

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No. 291: Bond and Bueller age, Farrell Fritz looks north and a Stony Brook specialist fills a pathological need

Yes, it is the first full day of spring: Despite copious meteorological evidence to the contrary, spring has sprung. The March (or Northward, or Vernal) Equinox occurred just on schedule around midday Tuesday, with an almost exact amount of daylight and night yesterday across most latitudes on Earth. This “Winter Storm Toby,” however, will have none of it, with Tuesday-evening models suggesting one of the strongest East Coast winter storms of this brutal season, and…


No. 290: A gift for Adelphi, a world leader for Old Westbury, achieving Orbit and learning Klingon

Marching on: That’s another workweek in the books, dear readers, and just four days to go until the official start of spring (the 2018 Spring Equinox occurs at 12:15 p.m. Tuesday in our Northern Hemisphere). Pay no attention to that talk of another nor’easter bringing snow to Long Island Tuesday night. Not going to happen. Nope. Proper introductions: It’s March 16 out there, a big date for historical launches – the U.S. Military Academy at…


No. 289: Einstein raps, inventors unite, LIJ expands and why flying taxis are closer than you thought

Slice of life: Welcome to March 14, dear readers, not quite the Ides of March (that’s tomorrow) but still a significant anniversary for mathematicians. The 426th, to be precise, of Ultimate Pi Day, which at precisely 6:53 a.m. on this date in 1592 marked the longest correspondence between the date and the opening digits of the infinite mathematical constant pi (3.141592653…) since the introduction of the Julian calendar. From cotton to Led: American inventor Eli…


No. 288: On awards season, Opportunity Zones, international patents and dumpster fires

Snow kidding: Another whitewashed workweek is in the books, dear readers, and if you thought Wednesday’s surprise snowstorm was a shocker, just be glad you weren’t in England 127 years ago today. That’s when the Great Blizzard of 1891 began its tear across the UK. Featuring 15-foot snowdrifts and crippling winds, the five-day snowmageddon is blamed for the deaths of 200 people and more than 6,000 animals. According to the story, snow piles were still…


No. 287: MDs on the fast track, IPS in the Smithsonian, new hope for the nipple and ESD doesn’t mean to brag, but…

Welcome to Wednesday: And over the hump we go, dear reader, as another week of innovation and socioeconomic progress plows forward. And we do mean plows. When’s spring start, anyway? Passing Go: March 7 is another big date for historical innovation. Charles Miller kept them in stitches when he patented the first U.S. sewing machine in 1854, Alexander Graham Bell let his fingers do the walking when he patented the telephone in 1876, and while…


No. 286: ‘King Kong’ lives, Janam Tech muscles up and Sammy Chu bites off more than … actually, he can definitely handle it

Welcome to Friday: You’ve done it again, readers and friends – another week of socioeconomic progress in the books, another weekend earned. It was also a Friday, 56 years ago tonight, on March 2, 1962, when Wilt “The Stilt” Chamberlain set the NBA’s unassailable single-game scoring record, pouring in a phenomenal 100 points for the Philadelphia Warriors in a 169-147 win over the New York Knicks. And that’s without the Nike endorsement: Speaking of record-setting…