Newsletters

No. 86: Koch speaks, Altman muses and an app that reads your smile

Post Paris Not included in the 350 or so injured in Friday night’s terrorist attacks in Paris are potentially hundreds more who survived without physical harm but will likely begin showing the symptoms of what is called survivor syndrome. Named in the 1960s following years of research with Holocaust survivors – it’s also sometimes called concentration camp syndrome – survivor guilt manifests in many of the same ways as Post Traumatic Stress Disorder. Some suffer…


No. 85: In-Fidelity, Eddie Cross and the $10 digital kiss off

Pitch slapped: There’s been mumbling about crazy valuations in the tech arena for months now, but the bubble began to take real shape this week as Boston-based mutual fund giant Fidelity downgraded the value of its Snapchat and Dropbox holdings by 25 percent or more. Fidelity has been one of the biggest players in the late-stage funding rounds that have helped venture-backed startups get $1 billion-plus valuations without going public or selling to Google or Facebook….


No. 84: Baby, it was dark outside

The Great Northeast Blackout occurred 50 years ago today, plunging 30 million people into darkness and trapping 800,000 New Yorkers in the subway. The outage, which began at 5:16 p.m. – it lasted 13 hours and covered 80,000 square miles – was blamed on Ontario grid workers who set a default switch too low, eh. One book, however, later blamed UFOs. Television and radio stations went off the air, and the New York Times struggled to produce a 10-pager for…


No. 83: Printed cars, a wicked Moustache and $1 million a foot public transit

Russian right over: The local daily has been urging Nets owner Mikhail Prokhorov to come by and chat with Nassau County officials now that the Russian billionaire has taken a controlling interest in the Coliseum revamp, the first shovel on which was turned yesterday. Prokhorov doesn’t visit the United States frequently – he attends only about 10 Nets games a year – but should he drop by, here’s a few conversation starters for Team Mangano: Prokhorov…


No. 82: Broken engagements, cars for kids and what’s eating David Calone

Yes, it’s Monday: A good start to the week everyone, and a special welcome to new readers, including Kirk, Erin, Barry, Ethan, Bob, Russell, Neela, Ron, the Georges, Sal, Carol, Arnold, Carolyn, Keith, Vikram and more. Glad to have you aboard. Also, we’re fist-pumpin’ proud to have LISTnet as a new sponsor. The beatings will continue until engagement improves: Employee “engagement” is the hot new human resource challenge out there. It’s making sure workers not only show up…


No. 81: From AutoDesk to Zootly, with some bacon-tasting seaweed in between

TGIF: A great Friday everybody and welcome new readers. It’s National Candy Corn Day, on which we celebrate the lasting achievement of George Renninger of Philly’s Wunderle Candy Co. in 1880 or so. The candy still gets its waxy charm from palm leaves. TOMORROW: National Call Your Dentist Day. NICE ADDS: Scott Rechler and David Dangoor have joined the board of the Feinstein Institute at North Shore-LIJ. You know Rechler as the chief of real estate giant…


No. 80: Mark Cuban, Uncle Fester and a real Italian hottie

TOP O’ THE WEEK: A great Monday, everybody and welcome new readers Keith, John, the Michaels, Mark, Erin, Bob, Flo, Bonnie, Sean and more. Oh, and an incoming sponsor, the Islip IDA. Can I see some jazzy hands on that? Thank you. Hillary Clinton is 68 today. Jackie “Uncle Fester” Coogan would be 101. (Still can’t believe he was married to Betty Grable.) THE DEBRIEF: AVZ’s Tom Murray on the 22nd running of his firm’s iconic biz poll. (Or skip…


No. 79: Uber’s up, the Hamptons are down and CA is maybe a push

TGIF: A good Friday everybody and welcome new readers. It’s Oct. 23, on which we celebrate Italian scientist Amedeo Avogadro, who decreed that a “mole” of any substance has the same number of particles, which is 6.02 X 10 to the 23rd. Perspective from my high school chemistry teacher: If you saved $1 million a second it would take more time than the universe has existed to save a mole’s worth of dollars. (And that was…


No. 78: Gluons, fake skin and white bucks for Billy the Kid

ISOTOPIA: The Nuclear Science Advisory Committee is pretty much what it sounds like – a group of scientists that advises the Department of Energy and the National Science Foundation on ways to keep America at the forefront of nuclear science. Membership does not require heavy lifting – the group gets around to issuing advice only every few years – but its recommendations can mean serious ducats for the places in which those ideas get built. Take Lansing,…


No. 77: Ratchets, new beer rules and lobsters claw their way back

TGIF: A good Friday everybody and welcome new readers. Just five days to go until the Innovator of the Year awards and the chance to hob and nob with the brightest stars in local invention. Big-name presenters, clever opening banter, sticky buns. Not to be missed. WORD OF THE WEEK: Ratchet. A once-obscure financial device that guarantees returns for investors when startups finally get around to going to market. It’s become increasingly popular as VCs start to fret about…


No. 76: Dick Cheney, Cardinal Richelieu and the 51st shade of gray

The Beige Book is out this week, offering members of the Federal Reserve anecdotal economic data and sentiment from branch directors, businessfolk, economists and others. The report is produced eight times annually, just before the meetings at which interest rates are adjusted. Or not. The book’s been around since 1970, originally with a red cover, but was not released publicly until 1985, when a reporter from The Wall Street Journal bothered to ask for a…


No. 75: Beer money, new kids on the block and Chelsea boots are back

TGIF: A good Friday everyone and a special welcome to new readers. This was a week during which even the cynics and doomers had to think, “Hmm, maybe there really is something to this innovation stuff.” For starters, welcome Chad Bouton, the neural research wunderkind who figured out how to harness brain impulses that allow paralyzed patients to move limbs, even their wheel chairs, by just thinking about it. He’s done loads more at Battelle, the giant Ohio…


No. 74: DealerTrack staying, German aid for Thrillist and the enduring hipness of Mason jars

TGIF: Greetings from the Long Island Business Development Conference in Montauk. Great opening keynote from Mark Lesko – on the eve of his new gig at Hofstra – plus panels on the issues most affecting local development: government red tape, job growth, public transit and, um, government red tape. Weather report: Cloudy with a declining chance of Joaquin. Today is National Manufacturing Day. Make the most of it. HEADLINES Cox Automotive completed its $4B all-cash acquisition of software juggernaut DealerTrack, which…


No. 73: Quirky folds, hello Neumann and the truth about man buns

TGIF: A good Friday everyone and a special welcome to new readers. It’s National Research Administrator Day, so if you do that and have one, please celebrate responsibly. Oh, and we heard the Pope is in town. Don’t forget to send us news, trends, scoops, criticisms and corrections to editor@innovateli.com. It’s been a busy week, capped by news that Quirky, the NYC-based platform that helped inventors develop household products in exchange for a slice of sales, has declared bankruptcy and plans…


No. 72: Lamborghinis, Roombas and forking off at National Grid

TOP O’ THE NEWS: The North Shore-Long Island Jewish Health System ended years of internal debate and off-and-on public speculation this week by announcing it would rename itself Northwell Health and launch a giant rebranding campaign. While maybe not the punchiest sobriquet to ever emerge from Community Drive, the new name gets the job done. The system, now the 14th largest in America, is no longer a cobbling of Long Island health facilities with Gold Coast or…