Newsletters

No. 293: Caligula rises, NeuLion roars, Israel energizes, and how a Feinstein researcher discovered a new human organ

Welcome: Howdy and hallelujah, dear readers – it’s March 28 out there, and it is not snowing. Further proof that spring has sprung: Major League Baseball winds up and delivers its 2018 season tomorrow, the earliest Opening Day in MLB history and the first time all 30 teams open on the same day (everyone last opened on the same day in 1968, when there were only 20 Major League teams). Mets host the Cardinals at…


No. 292: CEBIP cleans up, Biscotti makes a move and Albany’s new Life Sciences panel comes up short on Long Island

You made it: The week and the winter did their best, dear readers, but you’ve prevailed – welcome to March 23, and a clearly shoveled path to a well-earned weekend. This week’s spring blizzard was frustrating and all, but still nothing like the Great Blizzard of 1888, another March madness that blew in on 80 mph winds, dumped nearly five feet of snow on Saratoga Springs, crippled the Boston-NYC corridor for three days and buried…


No. 291: Bond and Bueller age, Farrell Fritz looks north and a Stony Brook specialist fills a pathological need

Yes, it is the first full day of spring: Despite copious meteorological evidence to the contrary, spring has sprung. The March (or Northward, or Vernal) Equinox occurred just on schedule around midday Tuesday, with an almost exact amount of daylight and night yesterday across most latitudes on Earth. This “Winter Storm Toby,” however, will have none of it, with Tuesday-evening models suggesting one of the strongest East Coast winter storms of this brutal season, and…


No. 290: A gift for Adelphi, a world leader for Old Westbury, achieving Orbit and learning Klingon

Marching on: That’s another workweek in the books, dear readers, and just four days to go until the official start of spring (the 2018 Spring Equinox occurs at 12:15 p.m. Tuesday in our Northern Hemisphere). Pay no attention to that talk of another nor’easter bringing snow to Long Island Tuesday night. Not going to happen. Nope. Proper introductions: It’s March 16 out there, a big date for historical launches – the U.S. Military Academy at…


No. 289: Einstein raps, inventors unite, LIJ expands and why flying taxis are closer than you thought

Slice of life: Welcome to March 14, dear readers, not quite the Ides of March (that’s tomorrow) but still a significant anniversary for mathematicians. The 426th, to be precise, of Ultimate Pi Day, which at precisely 6:53 a.m. on this date in 1592 marked the longest correspondence between the date and the opening digits of the infinite mathematical constant pi (3.141592653…) since the introduction of the Julian calendar. From cotton to Led: American inventor Eli…


No. 288: On awards season, Opportunity Zones, international patents and dumpster fires

Snow kidding: Another whitewashed workweek is in the books, dear readers, and if you thought Wednesday’s surprise snowstorm was a shocker, just be glad you weren’t in England 127 years ago today. That’s when the Great Blizzard of 1891 began its tear across the UK. Featuring 15-foot snowdrifts and crippling winds, the five-day snowmageddon is blamed for the deaths of 200 people and more than 6,000 animals. According to the story, snow piles were still…


No. 287: MDs on the fast track, IPS in the Smithsonian, new hope for the nipple and ESD doesn’t mean to brag, but…

Welcome to Wednesday: And over the hump we go, dear reader, as another week of innovation and socioeconomic progress plows forward. And we do mean plows. When’s spring start, anyway? Passing Go: March 7 is another big date for historical innovation. Charles Miller kept them in stitches when he patented the first U.S. sewing machine in 1854, Alexander Graham Bell let his fingers do the walking when he patented the telephone in 1876, and while…


No. 286: ‘King Kong’ lives, Janam Tech muscles up and Sammy Chu bites off more than … actually, he can definitely handle it

Welcome to Friday: You’ve done it again, readers and friends – another week of socioeconomic progress in the books, another weekend earned. It was also a Friday, 56 years ago tonight, on March 2, 1962, when Wilt “The Stilt” Chamberlain set the NBA’s unassailable single-game scoring record, pouring in a phenomenal 100 points for the Philadelphia Warriors in a 169-147 win over the New York Knicks. And that’s without the Nike endorsement: Speaking of record-setting…


No. 285: A DNA anniversary, an IPS milestone and connecting Old Westbury to Cuba

Well, that was quick: Can it be? Two months of 2018 in the books already? Be it can, dear reader, as this Wednesday, Feb. 28, finishes off one-sixth of the not-so-new-year. It also marks the 10th anniversary of international Rare Disease Day, as well as National Science Day in India, Peace Memorial Day in Taiwan and Kalevala Day, the day of Finnish culture. Word search: According to the story, Feb. 28 was also the date,…


No. 284: On plutonium, gun control and the video Q&A, with a Silicon Valley vibe

Friday on my mind: Spend your bread and lose your head, dear readers – you’ve reached another glorious (if wet) weekend. Reward yourself by checking out Eater’s list of highly binge-able TV options, the perfect cure for soggy Saturdays and soaked Sundays. Jiminy Crickets: Happy birthday, “Pinocchio.” The animated Disney classic debuted this date in 1940. Exactly one year later, at Berkeley, Nobel Prize winner Glenn Seaborg produced plutonium. Other debuts: Real boys (and girls)…


No. 283: C-3P0 ages, “Muni Coops” thrive, Flygirl soars, and why B2B salespeople should fear the machines

Over the hump we go: Welcome to Wednesday, dear reader, midpoint of your workweek and your kids’ winter break. It can be tough, keeping the little ones occupied this week, but any date that brought us humorist Erma Bombeck (1927-1996), jazz/R&B/gospel great (and civil rights icon) Nina Simone (1933-2003), beloved “Star Wars” robo-actor Anthony Daniels (1946) and legendary Long Island shutterbug Bob Giglione (born 1946, still clicking) is OK in our book. Previously on Feb….


No. 282: Honest Abe’s Day Off, stepped-up Suffolk septic systems and a sunny future for cloudy beer

Congratulations, dear reader: You’ve successfully completed another workweek. Your reward: two glorious days without conference rooms or deadlines – or three, if yours is among the 34 percent of U.S. offices closing for Monday’s President’s Day holiday. While students, teachers and virtually all government employees enjoy the day, President’s Day – which kind of floated into fashion in the 1970s, replacing the traditional observances of Washington’s and Lincoln’s birthdays – has actually fallen behind Martin…


No. 281: Love, exciting and new; Faltischek, cautious but hopeful; and the most popular winter sport you’ve never heard of

It floats back to you: It’s the Love Boat, dear readers, or at least your beloved Innovate LI Newsletter, making another run on this Feb. 14, 2018. It’s Valentine’s Day, of course, the international day of romance – at least, nowadays. Origin stories vary, but many trace the Catholic Church’s St. Valentine celebrations to a pair of executions at the hand of ancient Roman Emperor Claudius II, who whacked two men (both named “Valentine”) on…


No. 280: A TCJA counterattack, an interstate healthcare alliance and baby, it’s cold outside (but it could be colder)

Weekend forecast: Welcome to the blessed end of another busy work week, dear readers – and speaking of endings and beginnings, happy anniversary to the National Weather Service, launched on this date (by the U.S. Army, believe it or not) 148 years ago today. The NWS likely had a field day on its 64th anniversary – Feb. 9, 1934 – when New York City, amidst a legendary arctic blast that deep-froze much of the nation,…


No. 279: A new flu review, taking the fight to tuberculosis and why your fish might really like a cold beer

Welcome to Wednesday: And over the hump we go, dear readers, with another week of Long Island innovation and socioeconomic progress in full swing. It was 179 years ago today, on Feb. 7, 1839, when U.S. Senator Henry Clay of Kentucky – warned that a speech would offend abolitionists and pro-slavery factions alike, and could cost him the presidential election – told Congress, “I had rather be right than be president.” The nose knows: Walt…