Newsletters

No. 151: Big data, Danby passes and what’s wrong with guys on Tinder

Yep. Monday: A great start to the week everybody and welcome new readers Heather, Jim, Michelle, Janet, Dawn, Michael and Deborah. Good to have you aboard. Don’t forget to send us news tips, story ideas, releases, promotions, criticisms and corrections to editor@innovateli.com. It’s August 8: The PTO issued a patent for the first mechanical home refrigeration device on this day in 1899, ushering in the dawn of leftovers. (But it took them 32 years to add a light.)…


No. 150: Haddad rising, Zemsky oneliners and a liquor service pleads the fifth

Bon week-end: A happy Friday everybody. The Dog Days have apparently lost their bite. The first cornerstone of the Statue of Liberty pedestal was laid on this date in 1884. The stones, cut from quarries in Branford, Conn. and hand-pointed with hammer and chisel, came across the Sound by schooner, squeezed through Hell’s Gate, then moved down the East River and across New York Harbor by barge. Didn’t know this: The pedestal is mostly concrete but faced with…


No. 149: Pharma move, Feinstein grant and how Monster Trucks can save the planet

It’s August: Also known as National Catfish Month. On average, more U.S. babies are born in August than any other month. (Although that’s not why the Romans called it Sextilis.) Oh, and welcome new readers Robin, Val, Paul, Matt, Becky and whoever that is at Rocketmail. Great to have you aboard. Forwarding this newsletter to at least seven friends will bring you luck and good fortune. Honest. The big idea: Carbon dioxide, produced during the…


No. 148: Lab skills, brain shock and unkind words about Buffalo

TG it’s F: A great end of the week everybody, and better grab a sweater – it’s supposed to be a chilly 79 today. The Watkins Glen Summer Jam took place on this day in 1973, setting a Guinness attendance record. (So many people came early that the Grateful Dead turned their sound check into a two-set marathon. Devout Dead Heads can relive it here.) Happy birthday Ken Burns and Professor Irwin Corey, the World’s…


No. 147: Sam dunk, Star Wars drones and a job that won’t be missed

Don’t forget those fluids: A happy but still-sweltering start to the week everybody, including those who have decamped for Philadelphia. Oh, and welcome new readers Richard, Andrew, Todd, Bill, Leslie, Clyde and Robert. The U.S. detonated an underwater atomic bomb at Bikini Atoll on this date in 1946. Fears of fallout from the blast led to Japanese director Ishirō Honda‘s sci-fi classic, “Godzilla,” in which a giant, prehistoric sea monster is unhappily awakened and empowered by nuclear radiation….


No. 146: Cool albums, Dowling speaks and bomb-searching locusts

TG it’s F: A great Friday, everybody. It’s National Rat Catcher’s Day, which commemorates the Pied Piper of Hamelin. Some conflict: Robert Browning set the date as July 22 of 1376; the Brothers Grimm said it was June 26 … 92 years earlier. Either way, honk if you see an Orkin truck. Happy birthday Denise Angiulo, Michael Deering and Paul Arfin. Working it: Long Island added a middling 10,000+ jobs over the past year, but June was big. Despite…


No. 145: Smart pillows, dog wearables and GSK goes Apple

It’s Monday out there: A great start to the week, everybody and welcome new readers Cindy, Jan, Lauren, Rick and Paul. It’s July 18, on which Intel launched, Kim Jong-un took over and the world got scented Crayolas. Today’s the deadline for your bid to buy Yahoo. Try $6 billion. Happy birthday Richard Branson, John Glenn and Hunter S. Thompson. Top of the site: Marc Alessi took stock of his life and realized he had room for…


No. 144: Space junk, tech drain and why women hate calculus

Baby, it’s hot out there: A great end to the week, everyone. French military officer Francois Bouchard found the Rosetta Stone on this day in 1799, paving the way for the first modern translation of Egyptian hieroglyphs. (Or, if you believe the History Channel, architectural notes from ancient aliens.) Happy birthday Kevin Mulligan, Arianna Huffington and Marie Kominicki. But first, this: Stony Brook University President Sam Stanley sent a carefully worded note to Newsday this week, expressing surprise over the…


No. 143: Future pulse, brilliant kids and a 90-second iced brew

It’s Monday again: A great start to the week everybody, and welcome new readers, including John, Lisa, Carly, Gregg and Larry. Today is July 11, on which Tijuana was founded, the Babe debuted and “Mockingbird” dropped. Happy birthday Tab Hunter and Ross Selinger. Correction: Friday was not June 8, as the last newsletter suggested. Sorry about that. Also, to the 14 percent of readers who clicked on the Perry Como link, our apologies if “Hot…


No. 142: Robotic gloves, a smart helmet and happy news for your colon

TG it’s F: A great end to a balmy week, everybody. Today’s July 8, on which the Dow Jones Industrial Average closed at a record low of 41.22 in 1932. Live from Post Avenue: Westbury won $10 million in the latest of Gov. Andrew Cuomo’s economic development sweepstakes, this one focused on downtown revitalization. Also basking in the governor’s glow on Thursday: Elmira. Making news: Cablevision scion Pat Dolan has acquired 75 percent of the Newsday Media Group and will…


No. 139: Altice growth plans, a Buncee shout-out and why wart hogs don’t get lost

TG it’s Friday: A great end of the week to everybody who isn’t following the Brexit fallout. Could be worse: A meteor exploded over Chicora, Pa. on this day in 1938, killing a cow. The blast was initially thought to be a mishap at the powder magazine in nearby West Winfield. As one investigator put it: “If it had landed on Pittsburgh there would have been few survivors.” Happy birthday Mick Fleetwood. War stories: We’re teaming up…


No. 137: Meh jobs, DiCaprio’s in and eight ways to butter up

Bon week-end: A happy Friday to everyone. It’s June 17, on which in 1885 most of the Statue of Liberty arrived from France. (The torch arm had been shipped over nine years earlier to rally fundraising for the pedestal. The whole shebang was finally dedicated in October 1886.) Work to do: Private sector employment in New York grew at barely half the U.S. average during the 12 months ending in May, according to the latest monthly jobs report from…


No. 136: DIY brewing, third-tier VC and George still likes the way you look

It’s Monday out there: A great start to the week everybody and welcome new readers Rich, Ken, Syd, Tony, Bill and Christine. It’s June 13, on which in 1963 Valentina Tereshkova, the first woman in space, took off aboard Vostok 6. Yes: That would be a full 20 years before Sally Ride. The Olsen twins are 30 today. That makes them, coincidentally, Geminis. Age of aquarium: What to do when you can no longer see the little…


No. 135: Ballpoints, life of Ferguson and a shot at Ali’s art

TG it’s F: A great end of the week, everybody. Hungarian brothers Laszlo and Gyorgy Biro patented the ballpoint pen on this day in 1943. A French company called Bic bought them out in 1950. It’s also National Iced Tea Day, a major holiday for Long Island’s Kyle Chandler. Big numbers: Former Suffolk IDA director Bruce Ferguson has been honored with the NYS Economic Development Council’s lifetime achievement award. Ferguson held the post for almost 30 years and led…


No. 134: Park-ins, mood bands and meet Ground Force One

It’s Monday out there: A great start to the week everybody and welcome new readers Jim, Sue, Cheri, Howard, Deb, Mike and Dawn. Today is the 72nd anniversary of D-Day, on which the Allies landed 160,000 troops in France. The American numbers that day: 1,465 killed, 3,184 wounded, 1,928 missing and 26 captured. Richard Hollingshead opened the first park-in (later drive-in) movie theater on Crescent Avenue in Camden, N.J. in 1933. His patent was overturned…