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No. 59: Buncee up, Quirky down and the earliest look at Pluto

THE BIG PUSH: Stony Brook University Medical Center is prepping to deliver its 100,000th baby in the next week or two. Stay tuned. SMART TECH: Calverton-based buncee was voted app of the week by leading ed platform Haiku Learning. THOUGHT THEY ALREADY HAD: Uber overtook taxis as the most expensed form of ground transportation in America in the second quarter, leaping 9 percentage points over Q1.


No. 58: Russ Artzt, bio-Legos and a brief mention of unmentionables

STATE OF THE ARTZT: CA Technologies cofounder Russ Artzt has announced plans to retire. Not to us, of course, but that’s the word leaking out of Islandia. BIG PAYDAY: Converting Uber’s 45,000 California drivers from contractors to part-time employees, as a lawsuit there is demanding, would cost the ride-sharing giant 10 percent of current revenue, according to analysis by Re/Code. And it could probably afford the $210M annual hit. Of course, that’s just California. Imagine what Uber’s…


No. 57: Google carpools, Chipotle porks up and the state of U.S. beer drinking

AUSTERITY? THERE’S AN APP FOR THAT: Greek developers have launched an app to help people find out which nearby ATM has cash in it. WE NEEDED A STUDY FOR THIS? New research suggests men are more threatened by female bosses. ATTENTION UBER: Google is testing a carpooling app called Ridewith that would work with its Waze and Maps features to link drivers with passengers willing to chip in on gas and depreciation. No word on whether rides with driverless…


No. 56: Domegemegrottebytes, Google Glass and what a Benjamin’s really worth

THIS’LL MAKE YOUR HEAD HURT: Michael Schatz, a quantitative biologist at Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory, has been helping gauge who out there is producing the most electronic bytes per year. Turns out it’s YouTube, which is cranking out 100 petabytes annually. A petabyte, as we all know, is 1 quadrillion bytes, or a 10 followed by 15 zeroes. Who cares? Schatz does. Genomics, the science at which Cold Spring excels, is expected to reach 40 exabytes…


No. 55: Wind-powered bridges, a cool new brew and the machines are coming to Wall Street

INNOVATION GOES HIRE: Tech employment in NYC jumped by more than 40K, to about 115K, since 2007, a 57 percent increase and six times the pace of other job growth in the City. That’s still not quite what Mayor de Blasio has been claiming, but it’s impressive nonetheless. Average tech wage, BTW, $118K versus $84K citywide. Which may be why: A new LIA report on the economic links between Long Island and NYC suggests the number…


No. 54: Frack not, no-waste mayo and is one Beach Boy a band?

GONNA FLY NOW: PowerToFly, a NYC startup that matches companies with work-from-home moms, raised $6.5M this week, with the money going for a big expansion of the engineering staff. And, yes, all of them will work from home. FINAL WORD: NO. New York officially banned fracking as the state Department of Environmental Conservation issued its “findings statement,” finally ending a nearly seven-year review of high-volume hydraulic fracturing. The ban now has the force of law and will likely lead to legal…


No. 53: An energy plan, a Tinder for business and why we no longer love eel pie

IT WAS ONLY A MATTER OF TIME: Two driverless prototype cars had a near miss on a Silicon Valley street last week when a Google-operated Lexus RX400 cut off an Audi Q5 being tested by Delphi Automotive. No crash or injuries, but the cars were said to have exchanged digital threats and profanity. DON’T WASTE IT: You’ll get a little bit of extra time tomorrow as scientists in charge of keeping the planet’s clocks in alignment add…


No. 52: Hamptons power, a love IPO and July 4th grilling apps

HARNESS THE STARS? PSEG Long Island is looking to power the Hamptons with a series of small energy points capable of operating with the grid or independently, Capital NY’s David Giambusso reports. The utility hopes to avoid costly investment in transmission lines and new power plants, which it has said aren’t needed on the Island. Well, the rest of the Island. HEAR ME, SEE ME: Greenlawn’s BAE Systems landed a Pentagon contract to help Navy jets identify…


No. 51: Optimum’s up, chip-sized organs and even Rochester doesn’t like Buffalo

OPTIMUM SPEED: Cablevision increased the max downstream speed of its basic Optimum Online Internet service to 25 Mbps, from 15, putting it line with the FCC’s new definition of broadband. And at no charge. Speed fiends can also get 50, 75 and 101 Mbps service. Multichannel A VIRTUAL $1M: Arie Kaufman, chief scientist at Stony Brook University’s wireless technology center and chair of the computer science department there, has received a grant for almost $1 million…


No. 50: Human whitelists, 3-D organs and the kids are overrated

A good start to the week, everybody and a welcome to new readers including Jim, James, Tasha, Allan, Joe, Joseph, Cindy, Ed, Harry, Michael, Vinny, Tony, Walter and many more. Remember: We’re always on the hunt for story ideas, trends, promotions, criticisms and corrections via editor@innovateli.com. HAVE APPS RUN THEIR COURSE? Last year was a very good one for startup funding, with investments climbing 62 percent to more than $47B. The big winners: biotech and…


No. 49: Cool ants, a junk startup and why Europe will never catch us

BUT VOTING WAS FUN: House Republicans have taken another crack at repealing the tax on medical devices contained in the Affordable Care Act. The House voted 280-140 Thursday to remove the 2.3 percent tax, which has been a stick in the craw of conservatives but generates billions of dollars a year to support the health-care reform law. The legislation’s supporters argued the tax discourages innovation in health care. President Obama will assuredly veto the repeal unless…


No. 48: The scoop from Albany, awesome chalk and a guy who would be hops

STILL BREWING: Another Long Islander has taken to Kickstarter to fund his brew-related startup. Paul V, aka the Hopster, is hoping to raise $5K to launch a mascot character that would pose with revelers at local beer festivals and other events. Potential hurdles: Finding someone willing to wear a giant hop suit and “people actually loving the thing.” At last check, the Hopster had $650 pledged with two weeks to go. Innovate’s complete look at alcohol-focused…


No. 47: Twitter goes long, scary fossil possibilities and a computer that loves Lichtenstein

THE 1099 ECONOMY: Consider that Uber has 160,000 contract drivers and fewer than 2,000 employees. Though no one tops that 80 to 1 ratio, firms like Handy, Eaze and Luxe aren’t far behind. Behold the future of employment, where head count will mean something else entirely. Tech Crunch A CLEAN BREAK WITH THE PAST? Plastic is being printed into custom prosthetics and manipulated into patient-specific surgical instruments. Titanium powder is being used to produce implants that are…


No. 46: Schneiderman, Schumer and Bon Jovi plus the 100 best movie quotes of all time

NY CALLING: New York Attorney General Eric Schneiderman, still busily looking into Apple’s new streaming music program, found time to send letters to eBay and Paypal asking the firms to explain provisions in their new user agreements that authorize robocalls to customers. BECAUSE HIS LAST HIT WAS IN 2007: Rocker Jon Bon Jovi has joined Gov. Cuomo’s call for fair wages. TO SAY NOTHING OF INCONTINENCE PRODUCTS: The real downside of losing all our young people? We will…


No. 45: A future Foye, crowdfunding high rises and Sign Language rap

JOB INSECURITY: Port Authority exec Pat Foye has told senior staffers he intends to compete for the new CEO job at the agency, which is being reorganized following the Bridgegate scandal. It could be a tough slog if New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie has a vote: Foye blew the whistle on the lane closures, which have pretty much derailed Christie’s presidential aspirations. Despite lap band surgery. No comment from Foye when reached by Innovate. VERY DRY…