Opinion

Focusing on people power, in a cyberworld gone bad

By ANGELA COLON-MAHONEY // The most important firewall a corporation can put up to protect its network starts with an employees’ job interview, and is measured by levels of employee engagement over time. We tend to forget the human element when it comes to technology and the safety of employee and company information. We know that one click is all it takes to expose a company’s deepest secrets, and it’s usually caused by a disengaged…

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High school grads: What can you do for your planet?

By ERIC GERNATH // As high school graduates embrace their first summer without the prospect of a September homeroom, now would be a good time to ask: Who believes so strongly in the future of the planet that they will dedicate their careers to environmental protection? That career decision comes at a tipping point. Over the next 10 years, it’s projected that 37 percent of those employed in this crucial sector are expected to retire,…


In Houston’s JLABS, a blueprint for Long Island

By GREG MONTALBANO // I’ve been developing clients’ med-tech devices, in all possible applications, for 28 years, and my company has been doing it for 47. No, I didn’t invent a time machine (yet). As the second-generation owner of MIDI Medical Product Development, I’m helping to carry on Long Island’s long tradition of medical-product development. Our clients and their corresponding R&D mindsets have certainly shifted over the years, with more focus on supporting independent, entrepreneurial,…


Co-creator: U.S. must get back on the Maglev track

By JAMES POWELL // Our 20th century highways are failing us in the 21st century. The American Society of Civil Engineers grades U.S. highways as D-minus, with a cost of $2 trillion just to repair our crumbling bridges and roads, not including money to meet the ever-increasing truck and car traffic, which causes more congestion and delays. Our obsolete highway system doesn’t meet modern transport needs, and is killing us. Forty-thousand persons die annually in…


In innovative ‘opera,’ a new weapon in the opioid war

By GINA CZARK // How bad is our opioid epidemic? Consider these stats: In 1993, America’s peak year of gun violence, we lost approximately 40,000 people to firearms. The AIDS crisis claimed about 45,000 lives in 1995, the grimmest year on record, while 1972 was the worst year ever for car crash fatalities, claiming the lives of about 50,000 Americans. Some 70,237 people died in 2017 from drug overdoses in America, making this current crisis…


A prescription for success, in small (and all) business

By MITCH MAIMAN // What could working in an old-school neighborhood pharmacy teach you about running a cutting-edge tech firm? On the surface, these two wildly different businesses have nothing in common. But over the years, I’ve come to realize that I learned many of the rules for growing a successful business working in that drugstore as a kid. My family owned a neighborhood pharmacy in Brooklyn. Maiman’s Pharmacy was off Eastern Parkway in Crown…


Digital glory there for the taking on talent-rich LI

By DEAN DeCARLO // As a 25-year-old millennial, I can distinctly remember a world without omnipresent electronic devices. Then my father brought home a white Compaq PC, preloaded with Windows 95. I was awed by its capabilities – and little did I know a dramatic digital revolution had begun. By intermediate school, most of my Commack classrooms had smartboards. My fourth-grade website “The Weekly Video” used a “drag and drop” builder. It’s safe to say…