No. 133: South Shore wind, loving NY and why stoners have bad gums

Birthday boy.

TG it’s F: A great end to the short week, everybody. It’s June 3, on which human genes were first synthesized, Gemini 4 launched and the Stones kicked off their first U.S. tour. (Bobby Goldsboro opened. Really.)

Anderson Cooper is 49, Raul Castro celebras 85.

Little firms on campus: Stony Brook University trotted out its first incubator showcase, featuring 40+ startups, top researchers and selected electeds. (We spotted a few IP attorneys, too.)

A blow to fossil fuels: The Interior Department wants to lease wind rights to 80,000+ acres of federal waters about 11 miles off the Rockaways.

Staying put: Synthetic vaccine maker United Biomedical is buying, renovating and re-equipping its longtime Hauppauge space.

Love it or leave it: The state has unveiled its latest “I Heart NY” campaign, including TV ads that promo Main Beach in East Hampton and Riverhead’sLong Island Aquarium. Now through Aug. 7, New Jersey, Pennsylvania and Canada targeted.

Maybe coming sometime: The MTA has quietly started testing Wi-Fi on NYC subway cars.

Don’t forget: We’re now accepting nominations for the Innovator of the Year awards. Tell us about your favorite big-thinker via events@innovateli.com. Questions? Query Marlene McDonnell at the same address.

ICYMI

Pouring it on: The LI Brew Bus is back on the streets after partially staring down the insurance people.

Back in step: Former Rockville Centre police commissioner Jack McKeon was the first to get a revolutionary Parkinson’s treatment device being tested at North Shore University Hospital. He was dancing with his wife within 30 minutes.

Leggo my Lamborghini: Sweden has started using Applied DNA’s anti-theft markers on imported luxury cars.

Faster chips: Meet the guy who gets your snacks where they’re supposed to be. Pork rinds (Mmm, pork rinds) coming soon.

Creating a buzz: Feinstein Institute chief Kevin Tracey will headline the NY Academy of Science’s fall summit on bioelectronics. Chad Bouton also speaks.

Stuff we’re going to: Business Fundamentals hosts a boot camp for early- and growth-stage CEOs and CXOs, June 10, 11 a.m. to 6 p.m., Huntington Hilton, includes lunch and apres cocktails, $100 but use discount code SPS50 and save 50 bucks on us.

More dates: The rest of the Innovate calendar is here.

About our sponsor: Sahn Ward Coschignano is one of the region’s fastest growing law firms. Our attorneys are thought leaders, dedicated to achieving success through excellence. With our broad experience in land use, development, real estate and environmental law, we have the vision to serve our clients and our communities. Please visit us at: www.swc-law.com.

ELSEWHERE

Cancer costs: A record number of next-gen cancer drugs will drive oncology spending to $150 billion by 2020, up 50 percent over last year, a report suggests. Great for patients, a nightmare for insurers.

As in zero, nada, zip: Elizabeth Holmes, founder and CEO of troubled blood-testing startup Theranos, was bumped off the Forbes richest self-made women list this week when the magazine decided her stake – valued at $4.5 billion last year – is now worthless. (Roofing queen Diane Hendricks still reigns.)

Bespoke service: Too tuckered to make it home from your bike trip? There’s an Uber for that. The ridesharing giant, which raised $3.5 billion from Saudi Arabia yesterday (all cash), is launching UberBIKE in Amsterdam, with plans to peddle the service in other cities.

Fun fact: Bicycles surpassed people in the Netherlands in 2012.

Less fun: Although there is no formal law, Saudi women are prohibited from driving by religious edict. (Wait. Maybe that’s why they’re backing a taxi service.)

Sorry, Snapchat: Iran has given foreign messaging apps a year to move all data about Iranian users inside the country. Iran arrested 20 chat administrators last fall for helping spread what the government called “immoral” content.

Here at home: Snapchat has passed Twitter in daily users, now 150 million. (#no big surprise)

Welcome faces: Speaking of chat apps, Facebook rolled out 1,500 new Messenger emojis yesterday, adding such diversity as red heads and female police officers.

Listen up: Legendary Kleiner Perkins partner Mary Meeker is out with her latest report on Internet trends. Mostly up, although smartphones are in for a rough patch. Oh, and too many advertisers are trapped in traditional media buys even though the crowd has moved on.

Gearing up: 20 must-have tech accessories for under $20. (Each.)

Not sure why: The U.S. teen-pregnancy rate dipped 8 percent last year to an all-time low.

Breathe easier: Researchers at the University of North Carolina are developing a wrist band and chest patch combo that can warn asthmatics of an impending attack. Collectively, the wearables listen for wheezing and measure heart rate and blood oxygen levels, plus airborne organics, ozone, humidity and temperature.

Vaguely related: Xiaomi has unveiled a $23 fitness tracker. Taking a cue from the Apple Watch, it vibrates when you’ve spent too much time on your keister.

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BELOW THE FOLD

Next-next-gen: Students and staff at the University of West England have designed a bathroom light powered by pee. In Argentina, they’re harvesting methane from cow flatulence.

True fact: One cow produces enough gas each day to power a car for 24 hours.

No lines: Take a narrated 3D tour of the International Space Station.

Attention Tetris: Minecraft has sold 100 million units.

So maybe floss more: A study of New Zealand pot smokers concludes that long-term cannabis use leads to higher levels of gum disease. But, um, not much else.

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Compiled by John Kominicki. Thanks for reading.