No. 272: Stalin says hello, MSC Industrial rides the momentum and understanding why Central Islip needs two Marriotts

Mirror image: A new app will find museum portraits that look just like you ... hopefully, with eyebrows.

Well done: Congratulations, true believers – it’s Friday and you made it!

For successfully completing 2018’s first five-day workweek, approximately 37 percent of you (according to a Bloomberg study) will now enjoy a three-day weekend. Seems U.S. businesses treat Martin Luther King Jr. Day, a federal holiday, about the same as President’s Day, insofar as paid vacations.

(Schools, banks and stock markets get it right).

All hail: However your weekend shapes up, today, Jan. 12, is an historically popular day for autocrats. Emperor Basiliscus of Byzantine (A.D. 475), King Gustav I of Sweden (1528), King Bayinnaung of Berma (1544) and Emperor Yohannes IV of Ethiopia (1872) were all crowned on this date.

This was also the date Josef Dzhugashvili first referred to himself as “Stalin” (“man of steel”) in a 1913 letter to a British newspaper and federal Judge Kenesaw Mountain Landis, who would rule Major League Baseball with an iron first for a quarter-century, became MLB’s first commissioner (1920).

Punchline: Today also marks the one-year anniversary of a fistfight in the highest chambers of federal power, with lawmakers actually coming to blows over a controversial bill that would create sweeping new presidential powers.

Fortunately, this particular insanity didn’t occur in the U.S. Congress, at least not yet. This constitutional clash took place in Turkey’s Parliament.

Which legislative body would you like to see duke it out? Share your dream fight card at editor@innovateli.com – and while you’re there, drop off some story ideas and calendar suggestions. We love that stuff.

 

BUT FIRST, THIS

You booze, you lose: Better hold off on that kegger, kids. Albany has announced the results of a yearlong, statewide sweep targeting fake IDs and businesses that sell alcohol to minors, with a record number of fake-ID arrests booked in 2017 – and Long Island among the worst regional offenders.

While no region came close to the 414 sale-to-minor charges filed last year in New York City, Island establishments were cited 103 times – third-most among the state’s 10 regions, trailing only NYC and the Mid-Hudson Valley (142). But Long Island topped the fake-ID charts, with 239 arrests just edging the Finger Lakes (238).

All told, Operation Prevent – which teamed NYS Department of Motor Vehicle and State Liquor Authority investigators with local law enforcement agencies for sweeps of bars, restaurants, concert venues and alcohol retailers across the state – tallied 1,031 sale-to-minors charges and an annual-state-record 843 fake-ID arrests.

Makers’ marks: If you’ll excuse the phonetic butchery, omedetōgozaimasu to Japanese conglomerate Canon – parent of Melville’s own Canon USA – for earning 3,285 U.S. patents in 2017, the most of any Japanese company for the 13th straight year and the company’s 32nd straight top-five finish amongst U.S. patent-winners.

As astounding as 3,285 patents is, in terms of sheer innovation and unfathomable systemic organization, Canon’s haul was only good for third place among all those receiving U.S. patents in 2017, according to the annual list compiled by patent analytics firm IFI CLAIMS Patent Services.

For the 26th consecutive year, IBM ruled the patent roost in 2017, collecting an amazing 9,043 U.S. patents. Samsung Electronics was a distant second with 5,837 patents, according to IFI.

Rounding out the field: Syosset’s New York College of Health Professions, East Islip innovator Judy Wieber and Applied DNA Sciences and Traverse Biosciences, both of Stony Brook, also earned U.S. patents in 2017.

 

A few words from our sponsor: EisnerAmper is a leading international accounting, tax and advisory firm serving more than 500 technology and life-science clients. Our dedicated team of more than 125 professionals support startup companies, emerging growth, IPO-track and publicly traded clients.

 

TOP OF THE SITE

Double booked: Global hospitality kingpin Marriott International and a New Jersey-based franchisee have opened their second Marriott-branded hotel (on the same site) in Central Islip.

Eyes in the skies: New York State Police have deployed their first-ever unmanned aerial drones. But don’t get all paranoid – The Man isn’t watching you.

First and plenty: Rising sales, income and earnings marked a momentum-filled first quarter for Melville tools and supplies distributor MSC Industrial Supply Co.

Cell break: A team of researchers representing the Feinstein Institute and Hofstra’s Zucker School of Medicine are a bit closer to understanding why victims of spinal cord injury are so susceptible to infection – including deadly sepsis.

 

STUFF WE’RE READING

Bridge loan: The last three times the U.S. Open golf tournament was held at the Shinnecock Hills Golf Club, Suffolk County taxpayers footed the bill for a temporary pedestrian bridge for spectators crossing Southampton’s County Road 39. This year, the United States Golf Association will cover it. Newsday has the skinny.

Older and wiser and what else ya got? An undeniable benefit of age and experience is wisdom, something older job-seekers are likely to emphasize. But take note, gray foxes: Today’s hiring decisions are more focused on what you can do now, and how fast you can do it.

Widening gap: Already trailing China in the tech-based national security race, the United States is in grave danger of falling even farther behind. Blame it on the White House, reports Stars and Stripes, where anti-immigrant rhetoric and a lack of technological savvy are making a bad situation worse.

Help really wanted: There are millions of mid-skill jobs available right now at innovative companies around the nation. Forbes explains why connecting employers, job-seekers and the right occupational training is just as difficult as it sounds.

 

ON THE MOVE

+ Matthew Donovan has been promoted to partner at Farrell Fritz P.C. He is a commercial litigation attorney who earned his J.D. degree at the University of St. Thomas School of Law, his master’s degree at Boston College and his bachelor’s degree at Marquette University.

+ Frank Santoro has been promoted to partner at Farrell Fritz P.C. He is an estate litigation attorney who earned his J.D. degree from Brooklyn Law School and his bachelor’s degree from the State University of New York at Binghamton.

+ Nicholas Moneta is now a first-year associate at Farrell Fritz P.C. Moneta served as a law clerk (2017) and summer associate (2016) at the firm. He interned for the Hofstra Community & Economic Development Clinic and was a judicial intern for Magistrate Judge A. Kathleen Tomlinson, United States District Court for the Eastern District of New York. He also was a legal intern and paralegal at the law firm of Moulinos & Associates.

+ Rena Varghese now serves as executive director of the Nexus Center for Applied Learning and Career Development at Farmingdale State College. She was previously with St. John’s University School of Law in Queens.

+ Omar Tariq has been promoted to senior manager in PricewaterhouseCoopers’ asset and wealth management practice. His previous title was manager.

 

BELOW THE FOLD

Downward spiral: President Trump, Congress and the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act all take a whupping in the latest national poll by Long Island University’s Hornstein Center For Polling, Policy and Analysis.

Consolidation prize: Municipalities across New York are receiving Citizen Empowerment Tax Credits as a reward for eliminating duplicative layers of government – including Brookhaven Town, for its ongoing dissolution of the Village of Mastic Beach.

You ought to be in pictures: A free app finds your museum-portrait doppelganger.

Eighty-six ’em: The 13 things you must give up if you want to be successful.

Dare we mention: There’s really no such thing as “free” news. Please support great firms like EisnerAmper. Why, yes, that is Steve Kreit’s firm.