Vagus nerve

Writing the book, literally, on bioelectronic medicine

By GREGORY ZELLER // The pioneering work of several key researchers has made Long Island a focal point in the emerging science of bioelectronic medicine – their combined knowledge and achievements could fill a book. And it has. Fresh off the Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press comes “Bioelectronic Medicine: A Subject Collection From Cold Spring Harbor Perspectives in Medicine,” which belies that awkward academic title with a sharp and exciting focus: groundbreaking progress in bioelectronics,…


No. 420: Wheels up in Suffolk, Alda’s new Discovery, a vagus wedding and the survey says…?

  You win: The Friday finish line approaches and you’ve done it again, dear reader – another steamy workweek in the books, another well-earned weekend on tap. It’s July 12 out there, and if you had the Ottoman Empire capturing Euboea in Central Greece on this date in 1470, finally ending the month-long Siege of Negroponte, aferin sana! Here’s your receipt for 50 silver akçe, redeemable anywhere on the third-floor promenade. Freshly squeezed: To our…


Feinstein stimulates talk of an arthritis breakthrough

By GREGORY ZELLER // An encouraging new study out of the Feinstein Institute for Medical Research says noninvasive bioelectronic stimulation – administered through the outer ear – can effectively reduce symptoms of rheumatoid arthritis. The potentially quantum leap for the treatment of RA and other inflammatory diseases was reported Tuesday in Bioelectronic Medicine, an open-access journal aggregating articles and data from across a dozen-plus basic and clinical disciplines, including biochemistry, neuroscience, bioengineering, artificial intelligence and…


How to speak cytokine: a bioelectronics breakthrough

By GREGORY ZELLER // You can bet they didn’t use secret decoder rings. In a major feat of bioengineering and neurological science, a team of doctors at Northwell Health’s Feinstein Institute for Medical Research has intercepted and decoded specific signals the human nervous system uses to communicate immune and inflammation status to the brain – a potentially ginormous forward leap for bioelectronic medicine. This latest bioelectronic breakthrough at what has become the international nerve center…


Study is big news for Vagus pioneer Tracey

By GREGORY ZELLER // Medical science has taken an enormous step toward “using electronics to replace drugs.” Kevin Tracey’s words sound downright science-fictional. And no, researchers cannot wave a medical tricorder and instantly cure ailments like “Star Trek” medic “Bones” McCoy. But they’re getting closer to a world where high-tech implants – not pharmaceuticals – are the most effective treatments for inflammatory diseases like rheumatoid arthritis and Parkinson’s disease. A recent clinical trial in the…