No. 123: Income sharing, good news sells and dropping by Don Draper’s

It’s Monday again: Happy start o’ the week everybody and welcome new readers Peggy, Jean, two more Roberts and a Syd. Great to have you aboard. Enjoy the weather – the Island got three inches of snow on this day in 1875.

Apple should kick in: The FBI said it paid $1.3 million to crack into the San Bernadino terrorist’s iPhone, where it found nothing of significance.

Here’s something, maybe: Purdue has teamed up with a Virginia fintech to create an income sharing program that allows students to pledge a percentage of future earnings rather than take out expensive loans.

“We do not know whether we’ve created the New Coke or the first iPhone,” concedes Brian Edelman, who heads the school’s research foundation. NYC’s Jain Family Institute is advising.

Monday mentoring: Six life lessons from the baseball field from Swim With The Sharks Without Being Eaten Alive author Harvey Mackay.

Interior motives: Aenvision founder Richard Boz is fine-tuning the intuitive space-planning software he believes will make his Huntington Station startup a serious player in the commercial build-out business.

Kinda related: Archilogic does 3D models of your floor plans in 24 hours for $69. Check out Don Draper’s Manhattan apartment. (You can almost see the Canadian Club spills on the carpet.)

Remember Grit? LittleThings, an NYC digital platform that features uplifting stories aimed mostly at women in the heartland, is looking to expand its ad sales and establish a name for itself. (Should be possible. It had 50 million+ unique visitors in March.)

Point to remember: Uber’s $100 million deal last week settled class action suits brought by drivers in two states. Whether the courts get involved in deciding whether drivers are employees or independent contractors is a whole nother thing.

Fiscal funk: Potsdam, Pomona and Tannersville are not doing well, Comptroller Tom DiNapoli reports. Locally, Valley Stream is also feeling a little stressed.

Survey sez: 74 percent of Americans think manners and behavior have deteriorated over the past several decades, while 68 percent believe politicians are worse than the average person.

No longer in style: Beleaguered teen fashion retailer Aéropostale was delisted by the NYSE on Friday as shares hit 15 cents, down from a 2010 high of $29.90. If you still want to short it, look for AROP on the OTCQX Best Markets.

Fast money: Mark Lesko, Allan Cohen, Jeff Leventhal and Dan Polner debate the smartest ways for startups to raise the bucks, May 3, 8 to 10 a.m., Hofstra’s IdeaHUb, free but register.

More Innovate calendar here.

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Most-read posts of the past week

Moustache Brewing is getting ready to party.

Intimate apparel startup Impish Lee has 30 trillion designs. Each hand-sewn.

Big ideas – and big prizes – at this year’s Hofstra CPXi Challenge pitch event

A Northwell startup contest found many fans of 3D-printed tissue

Michael Sahn on revamping SEQRA for the future.

Botticelli Foods seeks new ways to push old-fashioned goodness

Energy-saving startup Jasmine Universe has launched

LI Index is seeking a new publisher for itself

Andrew Whiteley signs on as CSHL exec-in-residence

Daniel Preston the Luminati guy. (Continued reader fascination with the future LI drone king. Who doesn’t return calls.)

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Compiled by John Kominicki. Thanks for reading.