New York Institute of Technology

Innovation in the Age of Coronavirus

Now entering its final stages, the evolving COVID-19 pandemic continues to reshape the world around us, and myriad Long Island forces – large and small, corporate and nonprofit, industrial and academic – have risen to the challenge. Innovate Long Island presents Innovation in the Age of Coronavirus as a running journal of this region’s resourceful response to the greatest global challenge since World War II. Stay healthy, dear readers.     Numbers getting ugly across…


No. 557: On quantum speed, EV ports and Jane Austen – and to all, a good night

  A toast: To family, friends, good fortune and a rapid end of this global pandemic – welcome to Dec. 23, dear readers, and the heart of the holidays. It’s Wednesday out there, but this is, of course, the end of the workweek (and the work year) for many revelers – so Innovate LI raises its morning coffee to you and yours, with genuine gratitude for your support through this most trying year and warmest…


No. 556: On missing links, adventurous socialites and phased inoculations – and partying with Jett and Joel

  Winter wonderland: You had Friday on your mind, dear readers, and neither school closures, power outages nor blizzard-like conditions were going to stop you – and now here you are, on the brink of an especially well-earned weekend. It’s Dec. 18 out there, and as we wrap up another week of socioeconomic innovation, let us be the first to offer you mabrook – that’s “congratulations” in Arabic (phonetically), apropos on the U.N.’s World Arabic…


No. 549: On Truth, justice for Susan B. and the state of American bridges (not good)

  Let freedom ring: Welcome to Wednesday, dear readers, as we muscle through this latest busy workweek in the land of the free and the home of the brave. On that note, happy Independence Day this Nov. 18 to our many readers in Morocco (marking independence from Spain in 1956), Oman (technically National Day, marking independence from Portugal in 1650), Haiti (technically Battle of Vertières Day, marking independence from France in 1803) and Latvia (technically…


Study: Tech (and balances) for people with disabilities

By GREGORY ZELLER // Helping individuals with disabilities access good high-tech jobs – and helping talent-starved tech industries recognize a deep employment pool waiting to be tapped – is the main focus of a new study with Long Island roots. The New York Institute of Technology, which operates campuses in Old Westbury and New York City, and the Institute for Career Development, a Manhattan-based nonprofit workforce-development organization focused on helping individuals with disabilities transform their…


No. 541: In which Cool Whip, garbanzo beans and Godzilla get their due, and podcasts take over

  Healthy start: Welcome to Wednesday, dear readers, and the midpoint of this latest busy week of socioeconomic innovation. Before we get into it, Oct. 21 brings us National Check Your Meds Day, when we’re supposed to check the expiration dates on our older prescription meds, which is important. Go ahead, we’ll wait. Scales: Welcome back. Saluting cold-blooded creatures from the Geico gecko to Godzilla, today is also National Reptile Awareness Day. And fans of…


Laugh, and your super-accelerated AI laughs with you

By GREGORY ZELLER // New York Institute of Technology computer-science researchers are pushing artificial intelligence ever closer to human norms – including efforts to help AI better understand human emotion. The National Science Foundation has signed off on two fresh New York Tech research grants, each offering a modest sum but both important to their recipients, two assistant professors in the university’s College of Engineering and Computing Sciences. Researcher Houwei Cao will use her nearly…


No. 508: Boomgaarden rocks, Judy Garland sings, industrial forces go home and gougers get theirs

  Big day: Welcome to Wednesday, dear readers, and not just any Wednesday but the day Long Island engages Phase 2 in Albany’s official reopening playbook – an important step for those still following the social-distancing rules (including you, we hope). That means it’s June 10 out there – Army Day in Jordan, Navy Day in Italy and, here in the States, National Iced Tea Day, defending the nation from thirst. Well, that’s new: Today…


No. 503: In which we risk re-opening, plan retirements and map the world, with nowhere to go

  A Memorial Day to forget: It’s the unofficial start of summer, dear readers, and maybe the unofficial end of sanity, as another homebound workweek wraps up with Long Island on lockdown. It’s May 22 out there, marking the start of the three-day Memorial Day weekend – another pandemic bummer for the tourism trade, though still an opportunity for innovation. Calendar item: Innovate LI is clearing the baffles this holiday weekend, so no calendar newsletter…


No. 501: On Kepler, Mickey Mouse and Joltin’ Joe – and an A+ for Farmingdale State

  Almost there: Another work-from-home workweek ends, another stuck-at-home weekend begins – welcome to May 15, dear readers, exactly two-thirds through The Spring That Time Forgot. Of course, it’s a very different Friday in other parts of New York State, which are set to initiate reopening protocols today. Alas, as of Thursday, Long Island remained a couple of metrics short. Better shared: Speaking of sheltering in place, the UN’s International Day of Families and America’s…


No. 493: On foundations, fellows, foreign tongues – and redemption for your pandemic pantry

  Gives us pause: It’s Friday again, dear readers, and while there’s no end in sight to the great 2020 pandemic, the same can’t be said for this latest work-from-home week of socioeconomic innovation. On blood, and bloodsuckers: It’s April 17 out there – World Hemophilia Day, when bleeding disorders take center stage, and International Bat Appreciation Day, when we give the flying rodents – which are largely insectivores and great pollinators, and almost never…


No. 492: Surviving the great pandemic with gurus, maps, tax breaks and better-looking masks

  Midweek crisis: Welcome to Wednesday, dear readers, as we power through another work-from-home workweek during the great coronavirus calamity. It’s April 15 out there, and no, it’s not Tax Day. But it is the Universal Day of Culture –  celebrating a post-World War I international treaty protecting scientific institutions and historical monuments from war and other craziness, and World Art Day, a global celebration of the finer things. Loads of fun: It’s also National…


No. 491: On clean energy, Hispanic engineers and the autism advantage – plus, finding our religion

  Needs work: Hello again, dear readers, and welcome to April 10, the umpteenth day of social distancing and the 101st day of a year in need of major improvement. Interfaith intervention: So, straight from the Feel Better File, there’s this – today is not only Friday, it’s Good Friday, historically a big one for Christians but adapting a more communal tone this year. April 10 is also National Siblings Day and National Hug Your…


No. 488: A nasal passage, a naval plussage and the on-point Pandemic Primer – Island in a global storm

  Lockdown lowdown: Welcome to Wednesday, dear readers, as we hurdle our homebound humps – pardon the imagery – and slide into the second half of this latest coronavirus-shaped workweek. It’s April 1 out there – anniversary of the actual Last Supper, according to one historian, not to mention Edible Book Day, which (no fooling) is a real thing. Seriously: It appears this will be a down year for April Fool’s Day jocularity, with Google…


For future physicians, a Match Day like no other

By GREGORY ZELLER // An emotional rite of passage for future physicians has made a high-tech, if slightly more impersonal, Age of Coronavirus pivot. Match Day is an annual event during which graduating medical students across the nation open personalized letters from the National Resident Matching Program, revealing the next steps of their long educational journeys: their residencies, where they will spend years finishing off their medical educations. Usually a joyous tearjerker featuring packed college…