Sahn Ward Coschignano

No. 520: On endless summers, lasagna and NASA’s origin story – plus, Spectronics stays home

  Dog days: The Spring That Time Forgot has been followed by the July That Wouldn’t End – but we press on, dear readers, through pandemics and heat waves and whatever else they throw at us. Yes, it’s still July out there – July 29, to be precise – and if things haven’t been wacky enough, try this: Today is National Cheese Sacrifice Purchase Day. which is absolutely real and aims to both kill rodents…


Understanding executive orders (at least, trying to)

By MICHAEL H. SAHN // Federal and state governments have issued numerous emergency executive orders to cope with COVID-19. Simply keeping track of these orders is a full-time job; compliance poses unique challenges for individuals, businesses, industries, not-for-profit institutions, even local governments. Not all the orders have been consistent, or coherent. In many instances, contradictory orders have created confusion, discontent and, ultimately, a failure to achieve much of anything. In some cases, in some jurisdictions,…


No. 514: Adelphi evolves, Roswell crashes and da Gama sails again – plus Phase Four, with attitude

  Hot stuff: Hello again, dear readers, and welcome to your favorite regularly scheduled review of the Long Island innovation economy, back on the beat on this eighth day of July. It’s Wednesday, it’s summer and it’s pretty muggy out there – but keep those masks on, please and thank you, as we work together to keep COVID-19 at bay. Press start: Some say they’re the scourge of childhood, locking entire generations indoors and establishing…


No. 510: Kevin Dahill, Newt Gingrich and M.C. Escher walk into a newsletter … plus, strudel for all 

  We’ve been sprung: Welcome, intrepid readers, to the last Wednesday of the Spring That Time Forgot, with Long Island’s reopening proceeding on schedule – just a week, give or take, until Phase 3 – and Summer 2020 rising Saturday. That makes it June 17 out there, known best as the U.N.’s World Day to Combat Desertification and Drought, except in Iceland, where desertification is trumped by Icelandic National Day. Balanced approach: Here in the…


Sustainable land-use: A pandemic-recovery priority

By MICHAEL H. SAHN // We are at a pivotal moment in history. The unlikely but seismic convergence of a global pandemic, economic collapse and sudden, stark protest of social inequality have awakened us all to the need for change – our culture, our laws, our economy. This is a time to rethink how we live and work, and that especially includes how we manage our land and our environmental resources. From a global standpoint,…


No. 507: Electricity, shockers and smooth jazz, with light at the end of our national tunnel

  We deserve a medal this time: Welcome to Friday, friends, as we limp to the finish line of this exhausting week of quasi-quarantines, social upheaval and, of course, relentless socioeconomic progress. Yes, innovation continues – just ask Adelphi and these SBU neurobiologists and the 2020 NSPC Health Science Competition, which drew a record number of Long Island high school competitors. If current events have you feeling anxious, you’re not alone. Fortunately, the drumbeat of…


No. 505: In which National Grid gifts, interns rise and SBU psychologists dig deep

  That’s a wrap: Welcome to Friday, dear readers, as our abbreviated WFH workweek comes to an end and a muggy, late-spring weekend begins, with Long Island now enjoying its Phase 1 reopening. No, the pub isn’t open. Yes, you should still wear a mask. One Morgo: Before we dive in, a cap-tip for old friend Jim Morgo, the former Suffolk County economic-development guru who reached out following Tuesday’s newsletter, which noted that Molloy College…


No. 500: Voices from the past, eyes on the future

That’s, like, half-a-thousand: Welcome to Wednesday, dear readers, and a special edition of your Innovate Long Island newsletter. It’s May 13 out there, midpoint of another busy workweek, and this is our official 500th newsletter. Reaching this milestone years after losing Publisher John Kominicki – entrepreneurial founder, tireless promotor, driving engine – was highly unlikely. Doing it without you would have been literally impossible. So thank you, newsletter subscribers and website visitors, inventors and investors,…


The new war of the states, and why we might all lose

By MICHAEL H. SAHN // Fighting the war against COVID-19 has led to debate about the respective roles and responsibilities of the federal government and the States in dealing with these unprecedented challenges. The question is whether the federal government, the States, groups of states, or even local municipalities should lead the battle against the virus. Essentially, we are engaged in a debate about the U.S. Constitution. Under the Constitution, the president is the “Commander…


No. 492: Surviving the great pandemic with gurus, maps, tax breaks and better-looking masks

  Midweek crisis: Welcome to Wednesday, dear readers, as we power through another work-from-home workweek during the great coronavirus calamity. It’s April 15 out there, and no, it’s not Tax Day. But it is the Universal Day of Culture –  celebrating a post-World War I international treaty protecting scientific institutions and historical monuments from war and other craziness, and World Art Day, a global celebration of the finer things. Loads of fun: It’s also National…


Fail to plan, plan to fail: A post-pandemic blueprint

By MICHAEL H. SAHN // We are fighting a great battle against COVID-19. Healthcare providers – the people in the trenches, our heroic first responders – deserve our greatest admiration and deepest respect. But in a very real sense, all of us are on the front lines and exposed to the dangers of this crisis. We will prevail. But the costs will be staggeringly high, in both lives lost and economic damage. To recover, we…


No. 482: On the meaningfully diverse, the Uber forgetful and CPR’s most heartfelt replays

  Shift change: Push that lever, dear readers, as we reach the fulcrum point and gear up for the latter half of this latest busy workweek. Apples and overlords: It’s Wednesday, March 11 – Moshoeshoe Day in Lesotho (celebrating the birthdate of the mountaintop African nation’s founding father) and National Johnny Appleseed Day in the United States (which doesn’t mark pioneering agriculturist John Chapman’s birthday, but the start of planting season). It’s also National Funeral…


No. 472: On videogames, infectious diseases and historic blizzards (and the return of Capt. Picard)

  Center piece: Welcome to Wednesday, dear readers, as we reach the middle of another busy workweek – and the exact midpoint of the blessedly mild (at least in these parts) Winter of 2020. That makes it Feb. 5 out there, giving you plenty of interesting options – it’s National Chocolate Fondue Day, Western Monarch Day (celebrating the butterfly, not the royals) and National Shower With a Friend Day (which isn’t as exciting as it…


As climates change, a strong case for new land laws

By MICHAEL H. SAHN // We need a new, long-range vision for land-use regulation. The land we are regulating is changing rapidly, and this presents challenges and consequences we are only beginning to understand. Land-use regulations, codified in zoning laws, govern the way land is used and developed. The goal of zoning laws is to carry out a community’s long-range land-use objectives, in accordance with a comprehensive plan – in other words, to make sure…


No. 463: A family-friendly finale for 2019, featuring George Bailey, sangria and the sole ‘Survivor’

  Tied with a bow: Welcome to Friday, dear readers, as we wrap up the last full workweek of the decade and unwrap a full slate of holiday celebrations. (With that, a gentle reminder: Watch for your regular calendar newsletter on Monday, Dec. 23, then keep an eye on the homepage for updates through New Year’s Day. Thrice-weekly newsletters return Jan. 6!) Holiday China: It’s Dec. 20 out there, and to our many readers in…