Voices

Communications meets politics, on a one-way street

By DAVID CHAUVIN // I’m of a certain age – OK, fine, I’m old, old enough to remember George, the ill-fated and short-lived political magazine created by John F. Kennedy Jr., may he rest in peace. That magazine – which debuted in 1995 with a then-controversial cover image of iconic 1990s supermodel Cindy Crawford dressed like George Washington – aimed to marry the popular, celebrity and political cultures into one publication. Rolling Stone meets The…


Pressure point: As childcare teeters, moms are on edge

By JEFFREY REYNOLDS // Warm bubble baths, dreamy meditation apps and heart-pounding exercise routines are among the self-care techniques mental-health experts recommend to folks feeling anxious, stressed and depressed as they navigate a global pandemic that’s killed 220,000 Americans. For overwhelmed parents forced to choose between their kids, their jobs and their own wellbeing, we’ve lowered the bar even further, suggesting they take an extra five minutes in the shower or 10 minutes sitting in…


A century later, 1918 pandemic’s lessons resonate

By TERRY LYNAM // Given COVID-19’s unprecedented nature and global impact, many analysts and health officials have drawn parallels to the 1918 Spanish Flu, which according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention infected one-third of the world’s population – an estimated 500 million – and killed about 50 million, including 675,000 in the United States. Although the flu and COVID-19 are caused by starkly different viruses, understanding how the H1N1 virus spread…


As seasons change, Island producers bring the heat

By KATE FULLAM // The transition from summer to fall is fickle on Long Island. A stretch of chilly mornings, high winds and rain may retreat back to heat, humidity and a lingering beach day, even as September concedes to October. But winter is coming, and in preparation for the cold weather ahead, I highly recommend focusing on warming ingredients that will keep your body heated – and provide an exciting element to your meals….


Election Day 2020: America, start your chaos

By MICHAEL H. SAHN // Election Day is fast approaching. But no one should expect the U.S. presidential election to be decided until weeks later. There is the distinct probability that disputes and challenges to the process for counting and certifying the votes will extend well after the election, especially given the time it will take to count the large number of mail-in and absentee ballots expected to be cast this year. In a recent…


Pay attention: TikTok has already changed the world

By DAVID CHAUVIN // For those who don’t regularly interact with Generation Z, TikTok’s meteoric rise to the forefront of public attention is somewhat bewildering. Throw in the president’s public feud and the battle over TikTok’s pending “sale,” and suddenly the video-sharing app seems everywhere. As trivial as the entire saga can seem, it’s really the opposite: TikTok is fundamentally changing social media and the ways people create and interact with content. And even with…


Without galas and dinners, will charities go hungry?

By JEFFREY REYNOLDS // If this were any other year, our mailboxes would be overflowing with charitable-event invitations and we’d spend the next three months sprinting between Crest Hollow Country Club, Oheka Castle and the Garden City Hotel. There’d be small talk, speeches, swag, silent auctions and a nice chicken, fish or vegetarian entrée. Every night of the week. But this year isn’t like any other. Most charities, on Long Island and across the nation,…


A ‘common sense’ call for nursing home visitations

By TERRY LYNAM // We buried my 91-year-old father-in-law on Aug. 21 at St. Charles Cemetery in Farmingdale, one day after his wake, where most of his family saw him for the first time in five-and-a-half months. Because he was in an assisted-living facility, a hospital and a nursing home during that time, the COVID-19 pandemic prevented him from receiving visitors. He survived COVID-19, but spent the final 161 days of his life in isolation,…


On bread alone? Definitely willing to give it a try…

By KATE FULLAM // As we enter month six of dealing with COVID-19, the scope of this unprecedented experience begins to come clear –  and so do our national coping mechanisms. Much of the country turned to food as a source of comfort, part of a routine to get through it all. I found myself clinging to culinary comforts (with a balance of exercise) to get through the pandemic. It’s no surprise that baking is…


This land is my land: Eminent Domain to the rescue?

By MICHAEL H. SAHN // We need to get serious, now, about protecting the world from the catastrophic impacts of global climate change. The COVID-19 pandemic will seem uneventful compared to the long-term and irreversible consequences of the world’s rapidly changing environment. In time, we’ll have a COVID vaccine; there is no vaccine for global warming. Enter eminent domain, the governmental authority to acquire private property – “condemn” it – in exchange for just compensation,…


Science must win the COVID-19 info war (and it can)

By DAVID CHAUVIN // As schools throughout the country start the school year – whether it’s 100 percent in-person, 100 percent remote or a hybrid of both – one thing is clear: This school year is going to look very different. While parents, students, teachers and administrators determine what the new normal will look like for this school year, the big-picture question remains: How long will this last? Unfortunately, the most common answers to this…


Long Island’s helping hands need a hand, and a plan

By JEFFREY REYNOLDS // COVID-19 has driven Long Island’s economy into a deep recession, creating budget gaps of more than $750 million in each county and shuttering – perhaps permanently – thousands of “non-essential” small businesses: stores, iconic restaurants, gyms, hair salons and other enterprises. Most of our region’s health- and human service-focused nonprofit organizations, on the other hand, were deemed “essential.” They remained open and sprang into action, marshaling volunteers and resources and collaborating…


Understanding executive orders (at least, trying to)

By MICHAEL H. SAHN // Federal and state governments have issued numerous emergency executive orders to cope with COVID-19. Simply keeping track of these orders is a full-time job; compliance poses unique challenges for individuals, businesses, industries, not-for-profit institutions, even local governments. Not all the orders have been consistent, or coherent. In many instances, contradictory orders have created confusion, discontent and, ultimately, a failure to achieve much of anything. In some cases, in some jurisdictions,…


For employers, Direct answers to important questions

By TERRY LYNAM // Working in the medical field, you become accustomed to certain things in your social life. It’s a running joke that doctors are often asked to diagnose their friends and family or “take a look at something” during casual get-togethers. Now we’re hearing a new question: What will our world look like after the pandemic? It may feel like we’re finally on that other side. We have reached Phase Four on Long…


As summer sizzles, East End farmers make their stand

By KATE FULLAM // July on the East End of Long Island is magical (aside from the traffic). Foodies marvel at the local bounty, which starts trending now toward its peak in August and September. This is the time of year when cooking by stove or oven is traded for a chopped local veggie and herb salad … just perfect. Soon we’ll see heirloom tomatoes and baseball bat-sized zucchinis on farm stands, like the stand…