Newsletters

No. 120: Gift bots, smart pants and a self-arranging sofa

TG it’s Friday: A happy April 15, everybody. Long Island’s own Franklin National issued the first bank credit card on this date in 1951. Seth Rogan is 34; Leonardo Da Vinci would be 564. The contest: Giving inspirational names to economic development efforts is apparently all the rage. You’ve heard of the Buffalo Billion, of course, but what about Southern Tier Soaring, Finger Lakes Forward and Central New York Rising? State officials say they don’t require any…


No. 119: Cold Spring patent fight, Ruchi goes Glam and the dawn of the smart nightstand

It’s Monday again: A great start to the week everybody and welcome new readers, including Molly, Roxanne, Kathy, Art, Lee and Carolyn. It’s April 11. The Apple-1 computer was released on this date in 1976, with production funded from the sale of Jobs’ VW bus ($1,500) and Wozniak’s HP-65 calculator ($500). Interestingly, a vintage HP-65 still pulls $495 on eBay. Mark Teixeira is 36 today. He’s batting .278. Sorry, mate: A Patent Office board has rejected challenges to Cold Spring…


No. 118: Hulu on Optimum, a state Spend-O-Meter and drones with chainsaws

TG it’s F: The Venus de Milo was discovered on this day in 1820 by a Greek peasant named Yorgo Kentrotas. Not clear what he did with the arms. Julian Lennon, inspiration for Hey Jude and Lucy in the Sky With Diamonds, is 53. Meeting demand: Cablevision has started offering Hulu to cable TV customers through their set-top boxes – the first time the Internet-video service is available directly through a pay-TV platform as a dedicated channel. $7.99 per month via channel 605. Bob on…


No. 117: Baldassano builds, VW plants and the Taliban get their own app

Monday, Monday: A great start to the week everybody and welcome new readers, including JoAnna, Matt, Steven, Julie, Sharon, Michele, Leonard, Kate, Chaz and Bob. It’s National Chicken Cordon Bleu Day. Do what you must. And happy birthday Steve Davies. The road to the final $100K Innovators from Long Island’s top colleges and universities go head-to-head on Thursday in the regional round of the New York State Business Plan Competition. With $30,000 in prizes and a…


No. 116: A Bettr app, test-tube leather and disposable phone numbers

TG it’s F: A good Friday to everyone and welcome new readers. It’s All Fools’ Day, the celebration of which dates back so far no one is really sure how it came to be. The first recorded prank comes from The Canterbury Tales (1392), in which Chaucer refers to April 1 as March 32. (Middle English humor just slays me.) Veeco Instruments is reportedly in talks to acquire its main German competitor, Aixtron SE. ULC Robotics of Hauppauge has…


No. 115: A $5M contract dispute, smiley faces and how rich is rich in NYC

It would be Monday: An unseasonable start of the week to everybody and welcome new readers, including William, Toni, Glenn, J.T., Matthew and Shigeto. Great to have you aboard. Computer scientist Scott Elliott Fahlman, inventor of the smiley emoticon, was born on this day in 1948. “Actually, it is probably more economical to mark things that are NOT jokes, given current trends,” he said in unveiling the mark on a message board at Carnegie Mellon…


No. 114: Bad websites, mighty wind and tacos with Guinness sauce

TG it’s Friday: Hope you haven’t put the snow blower up on blocks. Bennett Cohen of Ben & Jerry’s is 65 today. Ben suffers from anosmia, the loss of smell and, as a result, taste. His work-around was putting ever-larger chunks of stuff in the ice cream. Chunkiest? Gotta be The Tonight Dough (starring Jimmy Fallon), sales of which benefit the Serious Fun Children’s Network. A mighty initiative: The feds have designated an 81,000-acre area…


No. 113: Pi Day, boot camp and a presidential shout-out

It’s Pi Day: A happy 3.14 everyone and hope you’re enjoying all that extra daylight. It’s the start of a week of heavy economic data, led by February retail sales and inflation reports. The biggie comes Wednesday, when the Fed decides on interest rates. Oh, and welcome new readers Lisa, Michal, Robert, Kent, Sydney and Lawrence. And Wells Fargo Private Bank, our newest sponsor. Glad to have you all aboard. Adam Haber and Billy Crystal share…


No. 112: Cyber whomping, solar surges and what a friend we have in cheeses

TG it’s F: A great Friday, everybody. It’s March 11, on which one year ago Innovate LI posted its first story, a scoop on former Forest Labs star Charles Ryan being named general counsel at CSHL. Thanks for sticking with us. Going fast: LISTnet has filled a third of the space at its new Digital Ballpark coworking space in Plainview. Ouch: The Senate passed a bill renaming the Robert Moses Parkway in Niagara County as…


No. 111: Modeling Trump, remembering Tomlinson and an SBU smackdown for apps

Happy Monday everybody and welcome new readers, including Mike, Laurie, Matthew, Jeffrey, Kevin, Jules, Elaine and Stefanie. Ray Tomlinson, the inventor of email and the first to send one in 1971, died from a heart attack on Saturday. He was 74. Tomlinson also pioneered use of the @ symbol to separate a user from its host. As he liked to say, “It’s the only preposition on the keyboard.” It’s over: Stony Brook University political science professor…


No. 110: Hack the Pentagon, SolarCity woes and dog days in Anchorage

TG it’s F: A happy Friday everybody. It’s March 4, the first day of business for the first U.S. Congress of 1789. Much like today, not much happened. It took another month for enough members to arrive in NYC to form a quorum. Advocacy by association: The LIA released its top 10 priorities for 2016 this week, headlined by a research corridor that would stretch from Yaphank to Uniondale and fold in the mixed-use Nassau and Ronkonkoma…


No. 109: Ren rocks, Hofstra roars and 2015’s top elective surgeries

Monday, Monday: A great start to the week everybody and welcome new readers, including Keith, Mark, Eryn, Diana and whoever that is at Deloitte. It’s Leap Day, which occurs in years divisible by four except those that are divisible by 100 but not counting the ones you can divide by 400. Got it? Good. Unstuck in the middle: Stony Brook University engineering PhD student Yufei Ren has landed a major national prize for his development of middleware, a kind…


No. 108: A really clean room, intravital views and why entrepreneurs are so hot on Tinder

And away we go: A much-deserved TGIF everybody. It’s Feb. 26, on which the official groundbreaking for the Golden Gate Bridge was held in 1933. Jackie Gleason would have been 100 today. Rethinking the wall: Immigrants are responsible for more than 35 percent of American innovation, even though foreign-born residents represent only 13 percent of the total population, according to new study by the Information Technology & Innovation Foundation, which measured innovation through national awards, patent filings and other…


No. 107: Maine import, the power of sleep and oh those naughty Neanderthals

And we’re off: A great start to the week everybody and welcome new readers, including Keith, Maurice, Lanny, Ted, Tad and Todd. (And thanks for the alliteration, guys.) Pump them up: ThermoLift has been named a finalist in the 6th annual Clean Energy Trust Challenge, the largest cleantech single-day pitch competition in the nation, and with it the chance to win up to $1 million in funding. It’s April 12 in Chicago. Tickets to watch…


No. 106: Asbestos duds, Edison’s foil and Playboy’s got new bounce

TG it’s F: A happy close to the work week everybody, and only one more day of reporting from South Carolina. Sweeet. Edison patented his phonograph on this day in 1878. The earliest surviving recording, made at a demonstration in St. Louis and etched on tin foil, includes the inventor reciting “Mary Had A Little Lamb,” plus assorted laughter and a coronet solo. “I was never so taken aback in my life,” Edison said. “I was always…