Opinion

To slow diseases, smarter environments are going viral

By SAVERIO BELFIORE and THOMAS KING // We send our children off to school every day with the understanding that our school facilities are safe, clean and secure environments. But if we don’t properly maintain these “controlled” environments, they may become examples of “great science experiments.” Students spend up to eight hours a day indoors, with hundreds of other students in close proximity. Children are generally more vulnerable to environmental contaminants than adults, whether it be coronavirus,…

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Oklahoma opioid ruling offers hope to front-lines LI

By KEVIN DAHILL // The $572 million that an Oklahoma judge ordered Johnson & Johnson to pay to the State of Oklahoma for the company’s role in the opioid crisis is the first such court ruling – among hundreds of pending cases throughout the country. Such sizable awards, earmarked for prevention and treatment, will help health providers and public health officials arrest this soaring epidemic. But even as state and county officials battle in court, including…


The economic case for the ‘wretched refuse’

By ERNIE FAZIO // “Give me your tired, your poor, Your huddled masses yearning to breathe free, The wretched refuse of your teeming shore Send these, the homeless, tempest-tost to me, I lift my lamp beside the golden door!” These are the closing lines of “The New Colossus” by Emma Lazarus, cast on a bronze plaque inside the pedestal of the Statue of Liberty. Recently, a Trump administration spokesman suggested a rewrite – a new…


Region unites against LI’s nitrogen nightmare

By JOHN CAMERON JR. // Each summer, annual reminders of our region’s water-quality crisis – including fish kills, toxic algal blooms and others – reappear. While there are a number of causes for the poor quality of many of our coastal and inland waterways, “nitrogen loading” has been a main culprit. Nitrogen from fertilizer and human waste enters our waterways and causes the excessive growth of algae. which uses up dissolved oxygen and blocks sunlight….


For freedom, justice and innovation, united we stand

By ERNIE FAZIO // We are about to celebrate the founding of this country, a good time to think about what we elected to call ourselves. The United States. Really? Are we still united, or have we allowed ourselves to drift apart? Maybe we are now like an old marriage that has grown tired and unexciting. But let me caution those among us who think the end is near: It isn’t! The strength of our fabric…


‘Ignored’ nonprofits rich with internship opportunities

By BERNADINE WALLER and THOMAS WARD JR. // A fine arts major creates a wall-sized mural for a seriously ill child through nonprofit organization Splashes of Hope. A political science major works at a New York City nonprofit helping low-wage restaurant workers understand their legal rights. A nursing major disseminates information for the medical community through the nonprofit National Organization for Rare Disorders. These are just three of the nearly 70 internships that our students…


To spark innovation, the master becomes the servant

By MITCH MAIMAN // “Servant management” leadership techniques are not new. This leadership concept, founded in 1970 by Robert Greenleaf, is broadly based on a philosophy that says the manager’s role is to serve the staff. The manager becomes an enabler for the staff, maximizing their operational performance and developing higher skills and capabilities. Skip Prichard, president and CEO of the global Online Computer Library Center, does a wonderful job succinctly defining the qualities of…