Newsletters

No. 301: On Morse code, award winners, second chances and a $24 million rock for the Montauk Lighthouse

Welcome back to the show: It’s been a dog’s age, dear readers, but here we are again, back where we belong, in your inbox and on top of the Long Island innovation economy. It’s Friday, April 27: And we’re still coming down from Tuesday’s high, our 2018 Innovator of the Year Awards show – a smash hit, if we don’t say so ourselves. Please remember, it’s never too early to start thinking about our 2019…


No. 300: Anniversary edition, starring Shakespeare, Dutch Reagan and Academy Award-winner Jessica Lange (and introducing Vengo)

An imperfect 300: Welcome, friends, to your latest Innovate LI newsletter, and not just any Innovate LI newsletter, but the 300th since founder John Kominicki e-blasted the first more than three years ago. That’s a lot of historical anecdotes, celebrity birthdays, regional shout-outs, hyperlinks, funding reports and Stuff We’re Reading. And we wanted to do something truly spectacular to recognize our tercentenary edition. So, we came up with… Suggested serving: These foods/serving sizes all contain…


No. 299: On ‘natural marijuana,’ (unrelated) reef madness, the patient experience and the myth of the innovation lab

Turning point: Welcome to Wednesday, dear readers, and the midpoint of another productive week in Long Island socioeconomic innovation. A special hello to freshly minted newsletter subscribers David, Nina, Mark, Pam and Franco. Welcome to the show, please keep your safety belt fastened at all times. It’s April 18 out there: And happy anniversary to Stars and Stripes, the U.S. military newspaper – and one-time home of an eager young cub named Kominicki – that…


No. 298: Jefferson lives, Foodcubate nibbles, Instacart heads east and the Long Island Index closes its books

You’ve done it again: It’s Friday, friends, and not just Friday but the 276th anniversary of composer George Frideric Handel’s masterwork “Messiah,” which debuted April 13, 1742, at Dublin’s New Music Hall (though we’d have cued this up just for the Friday part). Don’t be scared: It’s also Friday the 13th, of course, and if you suffer from triskaidekaphobia (fear of the number 13) or friggatriskaidekaphobia (fear of the day itself), you’re probably a little…


No. 297: On laboratory funding, adaptive reuses, ‘living’ foods and the Attack of the NASA Space Bees

It’s April 11 out there: And it’s hump day, dear readers, the midpoint of another busy week for the Long Island innovation economy. Put a little spring in your step with this rundown of the Best Songs About Wednesday, as compiled by the list-makers over at Ranker.com. Frozen in time: After departing Southampton, England, a day earlier and making stops in Cherbourg, France, and Queenstown, Ireland, the HMS Titanic steamed into the open Atlantic on…


No. 296: Welcoming Whiteley, smartening schools, terminating data thieves and seeing the ‘forest bathing’ for the trees

And down the stretch they come: Welcome to Friday, dear readers, with the finish line and another well-deserved weekend in sight. Happy Chakri Day, commemorating the establishment of the Chakri dynasty, to our readers in Thailand. In Indonesia, have a very happy National Fisherman’s Day. Congress is now in session: Happy anniversary to the U.S. Congress, which held its first-ever regular session on April 6, 1789, in New York City’s Federal Hall. Film at 11:…


No. 295: Schein spins out, Marcum surveys CEOs, FalconStor soars west, and how San Diego can save Long Island

Welcome to Wednesday: Over the hump we go, dear readers, and a special hello to new subscribers Heather, Lincoyan, Alan, Nick, Chris, Kimberly, James and Aamir. We couldn’t do it without you. Well, we could, but nobody would know. Now that you’re part of the family, drop us a line at editor@innovateli.com and tell us what you think. Story tips and calendar suggestions thrill us beyond words. Spring break: It’s April 4 out there and…


No. 294: Hofstra innovators rise, MunchMoney packs a lunch and SUNation’s shifting solar perspective

You’ve done it again: Welcome to Friday, dear reader, and the end of another week of socioeconomic innovation. That’s a lot of Peeps: It’s a holiday weekend, of course, the holiest of Christian holy days and another surefire bonanza for retailers. According to our buddies at Statistic Brain, Americans spend more than $14.6 billion on Easter-related goods each year, including $2.1 billion on Easter candy alone. By the way, although it’s smack-dab in the middle…


No. 293: Caligula rises, NeuLion roars, Israel energizes, and how a Feinstein researcher discovered a new human organ

Welcome: Howdy and hallelujah, dear readers – it’s March 28 out there, and it is not snowing. Further proof that spring has sprung: Major League Baseball winds up and delivers its 2018 season tomorrow, the earliest Opening Day in MLB history and the first time all 30 teams open on the same day (everyone last opened on the same day in 1968, when there were only 20 Major League teams). Mets host the Cardinals at…


No. 292: CEBIP cleans up, Biscotti makes a move and Albany’s new Life Sciences panel comes up short on Long Island

You made it: The week and the winter did their best, dear readers, but you’ve prevailed – welcome to March 23, and a clearly shoveled path to a well-earned weekend. This week’s spring blizzard was frustrating and all, but still nothing like the Great Blizzard of 1888, another March madness that blew in on 80 mph winds, dumped nearly five feet of snow on Saratoga Springs, crippled the Boston-NYC corridor for three days and buried…


No. 291: Bond and Bueller age, Farrell Fritz looks north and a Stony Brook specialist fills a pathological need

Yes, it is the first full day of spring: Despite copious meteorological evidence to the contrary, spring has sprung. The March (or Northward, or Vernal) Equinox occurred just on schedule around midday Tuesday, with an almost exact amount of daylight and night yesterday across most latitudes on Earth. This “Winter Storm Toby,” however, will have none of it, with Tuesday-evening models suggesting one of the strongest East Coast winter storms of this brutal season, and…


No. 290: A gift for Adelphi, a world leader for Old Westbury, achieving Orbit and learning Klingon

Marching on: That’s another workweek in the books, dear readers, and just four days to go until the official start of spring (the 2018 Spring Equinox occurs at 12:15 p.m. Tuesday in our Northern Hemisphere). Pay no attention to that talk of another nor’easter bringing snow to Long Island Tuesday night. Not going to happen. Nope. Proper introductions: It’s March 16 out there, a big date for historical launches – the U.S. Military Academy at…


No. 289: Einstein raps, inventors unite, LIJ expands and why flying taxis are closer than you thought

Slice of life: Welcome to March 14, dear readers, not quite the Ides of March (that’s tomorrow) but still a significant anniversary for mathematicians. The 426th, to be precise, of Ultimate Pi Day, which at precisely 6:53 a.m. on this date in 1592 marked the longest correspondence between the date and the opening digits of the infinite mathematical constant pi (3.141592653…) since the introduction of the Julian calendar. From cotton to Led: American inventor Eli…


No. 288: On awards season, Opportunity Zones, international patents and dumpster fires

Snow kidding: Another whitewashed workweek is in the books, dear readers, and if you thought Wednesday’s surprise snowstorm was a shocker, just be glad you weren’t in England 127 years ago today. That’s when the Great Blizzard of 1891 began its tear across the UK. Featuring 15-foot snowdrifts and crippling winds, the five-day snowmageddon is blamed for the deaths of 200 people and more than 6,000 animals. According to the story, snow piles were still…


No. 287: MDs on the fast track, IPS in the Smithsonian, new hope for the nipple and ESD doesn’t mean to brag, but…

Welcome to Wednesday: And over the hump we go, dear reader, as another week of innovation and socioeconomic progress plows forward. And we do mean plows. When’s spring start, anyway? Passing Go: March 7 is another big date for historical innovation. Charles Miller kept them in stitches when he patented the first U.S. sewing machine in 1854, Alexander Graham Bell let his fingers do the walking when he patented the telephone in 1876, and while…