Newsletters

No. 286: ‘King Kong’ lives, Janam Tech muscles up and Sammy Chu bites off more than … actually, he can definitely handle it

Welcome to Friday: You’ve done it again, readers and friends – another week of socioeconomic progress in the books, another weekend earned. It was also a Friday, 56 years ago tonight, on March 2, 1962, when Wilt “The Stilt” Chamberlain set the NBA’s unassailable single-game scoring record, pouring in a phenomenal 100 points for the Philadelphia Warriors in a 169-147 win over the New York Knicks. And that’s without the Nike endorsement: Speaking of record-setting…


No. 285: A DNA anniversary, an IPS milestone and connecting Old Westbury to Cuba

Well, that was quick: Can it be? Two months of 2018 in the books already? Be it can, dear reader, as this Wednesday, Feb. 28, finishes off one-sixth of the not-so-new-year. It also marks the 10th anniversary of international Rare Disease Day, as well as National Science Day in India, Peace Memorial Day in Taiwan and Kalevala Day, the day of Finnish culture. Word search: According to the story, Feb. 28 was also the date,…


No. 284: On plutonium, gun control and the video Q&A, with a Silicon Valley vibe

Friday on my mind: Spend your bread and lose your head, dear readers – you’ve reached another glorious (if wet) weekend. Reward yourself by checking out Eater’s list of highly binge-able TV options, the perfect cure for soggy Saturdays and soaked Sundays. Jiminy Crickets: Happy birthday, “Pinocchio.” The animated Disney classic debuted this date in 1940. Exactly one year later, at Berkeley, Nobel Prize winner Glenn Seaborg produced plutonium. Other debuts: Real boys (and girls)…


No. 283: C-3P0 ages, “Muni Coops” thrive, Flygirl soars, and why B2B salespeople should fear the machines

Over the hump we go: Welcome to Wednesday, dear reader, midpoint of your workweek and your kids’ winter break. It can be tough, keeping the little ones occupied this week, but any date that brought us humorist Erma Bombeck (1927-1996), jazz/R&B/gospel great (and civil rights icon) Nina Simone (1933-2003), beloved “Star Wars” robo-actor Anthony Daniels (1946) and legendary Long Island shutterbug Bob Giglione (born 1946, still clicking) is OK in our book. Previously on Feb….


No. 282: Honest Abe’s Day Off, stepped-up Suffolk septic systems and a sunny future for cloudy beer

Congratulations, dear reader: You’ve successfully completed another workweek. Your reward: two glorious days without conference rooms or deadlines – or three, if yours is among the 34 percent of U.S. offices closing for Monday’s President’s Day holiday. While students, teachers and virtually all government employees enjoy the day, President’s Day – which kind of floated into fashion in the 1970s, replacing the traditional observances of Washington’s and Lincoln’s birthdays – has actually fallen behind Martin…


No. 281: Love, exciting and new; Faltischek, cautious but hopeful; and the most popular winter sport you’ve never heard of

It floats back to you: It’s the Love Boat, dear readers, or at least your beloved Innovate LI Newsletter, making another run on this Feb. 14, 2018. It’s Valentine’s Day, of course, the international day of romance – at least, nowadays. Origin stories vary, but many trace the Catholic Church’s St. Valentine celebrations to a pair of executions at the hand of ancient Roman Emperor Claudius II, who whacked two men (both named “Valentine”) on…


No. 280: A TCJA counterattack, an interstate healthcare alliance and baby, it’s cold outside (but it could be colder)

Weekend forecast: Welcome to the blessed end of another busy work week, dear readers – and speaking of endings and beginnings, happy anniversary to the National Weather Service, launched on this date (by the U.S. Army, believe it or not) 148 years ago today. The NWS likely had a field day on its 64th anniversary – Feb. 9, 1934 – when New York City, amidst a legendary arctic blast that deep-froze much of the nation,…


No. 279: A new flu review, taking the fight to tuberculosis and why your fish might really like a cold beer

Welcome to Wednesday: And over the hump we go, dear readers, with another week of Long Island innovation and socioeconomic progress in full swing. It was 179 years ago today, on Feb. 7, 1839, when U.S. Senator Henry Clay of Kentucky – warned that a speech would offend abolitionists and pro-slavery factions alike, and could cost him the presidential election – told Congress, “I had rather be right than be president.” The nose knows: Walt…


No. 278: NASA in Melville, economic impact in Farmingdale, bottom-line battles and 25 years of ‘Groundhog Day’

TGIF: Welcome, friends old and new, to the end of a cold and snowy workweek. It’s Feb. 2, and it was 78 years ago today when a famous bandleader invited an unknown singer from Hoboken, NJ, to perform on stage at a bobbysoxer gig in Indianapolis. It would not be the last time Frank Sinatra would perform with the Tommy Dorsey Orchestra. Déjà vu: It’s also Groundhog Day, again, and in case you were wondering,…


No. 277: The prodigal team returns, Hofstra ups its entrepreneurial game and yes, Florham Park is still in New Jersey

Time flies: Welcome to Jan. 31, dear readers, already one month down in 2018. Hard to believe it’s been 322 years since Aansprekersoproer, the bloody revolt by undertakers across Amsterdam sparked by Dutch funeral reforms (yes, this happened), and a year already since President Trump fired Attorney General Sally Yates for refusing to defend his illegal travel ban. In between: Other Jan. 31 events of interest include the invention of condensed milk (1851); the ratification…


No. 276: John Kominicki remembered and Island manufacturing re-imagined, with just two minutes left until the apocalypse

Happy Friday, everyone: And welcome to another well-earned weekend. Tribute To A Friend Friends and colleagues of Innovate Long Island founder John Kominicki are invited to a memorial remembrance on Sunday, Feb. 18, from 4 to 6 p.m. at Crest Hollow Country Club in Woodbury. We will talk, share stories and celebrate his life. Friends may remember that John liked to dress casually, and had a couple of sartorial preferences: a silk pocket square stuffed…


No. 275: On pipelines, solar farms, industrial parks and local innovators spreading around the world – without leaving LI

And you were there: Welcome, dear reader, to a fairly quirky Wednesday, chronologically speaking. Turns out Jan. 24 is less likely to fall on a Monday or Wednesday (56 times every 400 years) than a Friday or Saturday (57 times) or a Tuesday, Thursday or Sunday (58). It was a Thursday, way back in 41 AD, when Roman Emperor Caligula was offed by his own Praetorian Guard; a Tuesday, in 1989, when notorious serial killer…


No. 274: Out-of-the-Voxx thinking, a literal lightbulb moment, an Amazonian longshot and making waves in Hauppauge

The end of the tunnel (and lights): Welcome to the blessed end of another work week. Today is Jan. 19 and the 135th anniversary of the first-ever electric lighting system employing overhead wires – Thomas Edison’s novel system started juicing Roselle, NJ, on this date in 1883. Speaking of bright ideas: The neon tube light was patented on this date, by inventor George Claude (1915), and the granddaddy of wordy board games, Scrabble, made its…


No. 273: Legalizing pot in NY, hacking with Homeland Security and new growth for Broadridge, Digital Donations and a CA spinoff

Marching on: Welcome to another week of Long Island innovation, and to what is actually a red-letter date in African-American history. While historical icons including Augustus Caesar, Christopher Columbus and Dwight Eisenhower all surface on Jan. 17, in honor of Monday’s Martin Luther King Jr. Day celebration, let’s spotlight Sherman’s Field Order No. 15, issued this date in 1865 by Union General William T. Sherman following his legendary March to the Sea. The order confiscated…


No. 272: Stalin says hello, MSC Industrial rides the momentum and understanding why Central Islip needs two Marriotts

Well done: Congratulations, true believers – it’s Friday and you made it! For successfully completing 2018’s first five-day workweek, approximately 37 percent of you (according to a Bloomberg study) will now enjoy a three-day weekend. Seems U.S. businesses treat Martin Luther King Jr. Day, a federal holiday, about the same as President’s Day, insofar as paid vacations. (Schools, banks and stock markets get it right). All hail: However your weekend shapes up, today, Jan. 12,…