Newsletters

Cablevision CEO James Dolan

No. 160: Wages up, Jim Dolan doubles down and a Brooklyn bacon blowout

TG it’s F: A happy Friday, everybody. It’s National POW-MIA Recognition Day. Take a moment to salute the 83,000 American service members still unaccounted for. Previously: The first working photocopier, the Xerox 914, was unveiled on live TV on this day in 1959. (In NYC, natch.) Happy birthday, Jeanne Fontana. But first, this: American household income jumped by more than 5 percent in 2015, the Census Bureau reported this week, the biggest annual increase since…


No. 159: Jack Kilby, engineering jobs and the LISAs at 20

It’s Monday out there: A great start to the week, everybody, and welcome new readers Linda, Keith, Kathleen, Ari and Lizbeth. Happy to have you aboard. Collectively, don’t forget to send tips, story ideas, news releases, promotions, comments and corrections to editor@innovateli.com. Previously, on Sept. 12: Hungarian scientist Leó Szilárd, waiting at a pedestrian crossing light in London in 1933, conceived the idea of nuclear chain reactions, paving the way for the Manhattan Project. (Must’ve been a long light.)…


No. 158: Rising pay, fewer eats and a new role for Newman

TG it’s F: A happy ending to a short but busy week everybody, and thanks for nothing Hermine. Sincerely. On this day previously: Japanese pilot Nobuo Fujita dropped two incendiary bombs near Brookings, Ore. in 1942, hoping to start a forest fire. He didn’t. Fujita was invited back 20 years later to serve as grand marshal of the town’s Azalea Festival. One of the bombs is still missing. Behind the headlines: Vox has everything Gary Johnson should have…


No. 157: Handy Census data, Taubin rising and guess who’s not an Eagle scout

TGILDW: A great long and safe Labor Day weekend, everybody. The Innovate staff is also taking time out to honor the American worker, so no Monday newsletter. (There will be barbecue, however.) Today is Sept. 2, on which JRR Tolkien and Bob Denver passed, Walter Cronkite’s broadcast was expanded to 30 minutes and Arthur Eldred was named the first Eagle Scout. Quick quiz: Which of the following was not an Eagle Scout? Shock-doc filmmaker Michael…


No. 156: Pharma jobs, exploring the planet and 10 tips on finding talent

TG it’s F: A happy Friday, everybody. Charles Thurber received a patent on this day for a typewriter designed for “the blind and the nervous.” Also, in no special order, U.S. women received the right to vote, Michelangelo was commissioned to carve the Pietà and John Fitch began operating the first commercial steamboat. (Not successfully, because traveling over land by wagon was quicker.) It’s National Webmistress Day. Hug one if your HR rules allow it….


No. 155: Masucci rocks, Boltivate locks and the hippiest place in NY

Monday, Monday: A great start to the week everybody and a shout-out to new readers Lauri, Donna, Kim, Lee, Robert and Diane. Happy to have you aboard. The Beatles arrived in NYC on this day in 1966 for what would be their last concert tour. A previous stop in the Philippines had gone badly after the band inadvertently dissed first lady Imelda Marcos by skipping a lunch invite. “If we go back,” John Lennon said…


No. 154: Jobs, biker coffee and why we call him Mr. Hogan

Happy Friday: A great end o’ the week, everybody. Only 16 days before it’s time to stow the white bucks, so let’s make the most of them. Copiague’s bluegrass festival, perhaps? Or how about the annual Potunk Masonic Temple pig roast in Westhampton? And let’s not forget Riverhead’s Polish Town Fair and Polka Festival, featuring Mike Costa and The Beat. (One-two-three, one-two-three …) Gail Borden received a patent on this day in 1856 for his process…


No. 153: Thank you Tritec, a mood-altering wearable and when to use a chork

It’s Monday out there: A great start to another hot and slow week everybody, and welcome new readers Robert, Sarah, Steve, Alan and Qbany. On this date in 1877, Thomas Edison successfully argued that the telephone should be properly answered with “hello” and not “ahoy,” as inventor Alexander Graham Bell was promoting. Richie Havens took to the stage at 5:07 p.m. in 1969, kicking off what would become known, simply, as Woodstock. (Roy Rogers had been asked…


No. 152: Mixed earnings, the Shack shakes and welcome mental viagra

TG it’s F: A great end to the week everybody and don’t forget to rehydrate. These work. And hope you had a chance to catch the Comet Swift-Tuttle meteor shower last night. Tonight’s also a possibility. The particles burning up in the atmosphere right now flaked off the comet as long ago as 1079. Today is National Middle Child Day. Enjoy it if you are one – it’s all the attention you’re ever going to get. Happy…


No. 151: Big data, Danby passes and what’s wrong with guys on Tinder

Yep. Monday: A great start to the week everybody and welcome new readers Heather, Jim, Michelle, Janet, Dawn, Michael and Deborah. Good to have you aboard. Don’t forget to send us news tips, story ideas, releases, promotions, criticisms and corrections to editor@innovateli.com. It’s August 8: The PTO issued a patent for the first mechanical home refrigeration device on this day in 1899, ushering in the dawn of leftovers. (But it took them 32 years to add a light.)…


No. 150: Haddad rising, Zemsky oneliners and a liquor service pleads the fifth

Bon week-end: A happy Friday everybody. The Dog Days have apparently lost their bite. The first cornerstone of the Statue of Liberty pedestal was laid on this date in 1884. The stones, cut from quarries in Branford, Conn. and hand-pointed with hammer and chisel, came across the Sound by schooner, squeezed through Hell’s Gate, then moved down the East River and across New York Harbor by barge. Didn’t know this: The pedestal is mostly concrete but faced with…


No. 149: Pharma move, Feinstein grant and how Monster Trucks can save the planet

It’s August: Also known as National Catfish Month. On average, more U.S. babies are born in August than any other month. (Although that’s not why the Romans called it Sextilis.) Oh, and welcome new readers Robin, Val, Paul, Matt, Becky and whoever that is at Rocketmail. Great to have you aboard. Forwarding this newsletter to at least seven friends will bring you luck and good fortune. Honest. The big idea: Carbon dioxide, produced during the…


No. 148: Lab skills, brain shock and unkind words about Buffalo

TG it’s F: A great end of the week everybody, and better grab a sweater – it’s supposed to be a chilly 79 today. The Watkins Glen Summer Jam took place on this day in 1973, setting a Guinness attendance record. (So many people came early that the Grateful Dead turned their sound check into a two-set marathon. Devout Dead Heads can relive it here.) Happy birthday Ken Burns and Professor Irwin Corey, the World’s…


No. 147: Sam dunk, Star Wars drones and a job that won’t be missed

Don’t forget those fluids: A happy but still-sweltering start to the week everybody, including those who have decamped for Philadelphia. Oh, and welcome new readers Richard, Andrew, Todd, Bill, Leslie, Clyde and Robert. The U.S. detonated an underwater atomic bomb at Bikini Atoll on this date in 1946. Fears of fallout from the blast led to Japanese director Ishirō Honda‘s sci-fi classic, “Godzilla,” in which a giant, prehistoric sea monster is unhappily awakened and empowered by nuclear radiation….


No. 146: Cool albums, Dowling speaks and bomb-searching locusts

TG it’s F: A great Friday, everybody. It’s National Rat Catcher’s Day, which commemorates the Pied Piper of Hamelin. Some conflict: Robert Browning set the date as July 22 of 1376; the Brothers Grimm said it was June 26 … 92 years earlier. Either way, honk if you see an Orkin truck. Happy birthday Denise Angiulo, Michael Deering and Paul Arfin. Working it: Long Island added a middling 10,000+ jobs over the past year, but June was big. Despite…