opinion

A smarter approach to pandemic-era research funding

By MITCH MAIMAN // It’s heartening to see both the business and charitable investments going into COVID-19 research. I’m certain that the institutions and individuals making these investments want to see the money create the greatest impact possible. But is it? Those who want their funding to have the most useful result should make sure they are funding an area where there is a unique need. I see money flowing into research in problem areas…


Feedback should lift employees, not beat them down

By ELIZABETH UZZO // Constructive feedback is one of the most positive and productive things a manager can offer employees. Too often, feedback is perceived as intimidating or scary by both employees and managers. We frequently associate “feedback” with being “criticized,” which can make both giving and receiving it uncomfortable. It doesn’t need to be that way. Done correctly – with the right structure, support and attitude – quality feedback can be a gift, and…


In Smithtown, a blueprint for mixed-use progress

By TERRI ALESSI-MICELI // Some live only in the present, heedless of the future. Happily, however, the Town of Smithtown is thinking about the future. Specifically, the town has been devising smart strategies for keeping our young people here on Long Island. Meantime, young Long Islanders are thinking about their futures, too. But unfortunately, the vast majority of them don’t foresee a future here. Unless things change. The Rauch Foundation issued an extensive “Next Generation…


Questioning the risks, rewards of re-opening

By MITCH MAIMAN // As an executive who grapples daily with phased re-openings and other issues of economic survival, testing is a major consideration. There are treatises on this subject alleging to provide answers, but still way more questions. First, let’s assume that a team wants to be socially responsible – that is, nobody wants to come to work sick with COVID-19, whether they’re showing symptoms or not. Let’s further assume that when we want…


No recovery without trade groups, which need support

By TERRI ALESSI-MICELI // We generally think of COVID-19’s devastation in terms of its human toll and its economic toll. Indeed, the pandemic is registering a terrible impact on the health of many Long Islanders. And our region’s healthcare sector is battling valiantly to save lives and minimize the medical effects of this crisis. At the same time, the pandemic is causing massive disruption throughout the Long Island economy. Thousands of regional businesses have closed…


Healthcare pros watching Congress, Trump closely

By ALLISON JUMETT // It has been a challenging, frightening time for everyone, but especially for those of us working in healthcare. Amid all the suffering and anxiety brought about by COVID-19, healthcare workers on the front lines have continued to show up and display strength, faith and courage in taking care of the most vulnerable. During these difficult times, I have never seen such dedication displayed by my co-workers in healthcare facilities across the…


‘Monumental’ moves help FSC respond, move forward

By JOHN NADER // The past few weeks have been challenging for all of us, and especially for our students preparing to complete their degrees, graduate school and enter the job market. Higher-education institutions have a unique responsibility – not only to continue to operate in a remote environment, but also to find ways to be a source of comfort. As a campus community, we have made monumental and creative adjustments since the onset of…


Debating the ethics of AI (before it’s too late)

By JOHN MAGLIOCCO JR. // With highly sophisticated algorithms and rapid advancements in storing, processing and analyzing data, artificial intelligence is making its presence known in the world today. With this, an ethical dilemma has surfaced that needs to be addressed immediately. Who will be responsible for the ethical decisions made by artificially intelligent machines? Failing to respond to the relevance and significance of this dilemma could skyrocket crime and death rates across the world….


In Greta, a moment – and a champion – for autism

By STEPHEN SHORE // In just several months, Greta Thunberg, 16, has flayed international leaders, electrified climate advocates and served notice that her generation will bring new urgency to saving the planet. Her voice is forceful, her intensity unapologetic and her expressions candid. She’s also on the autism spectrum, diagnosed with Asperger syndrome, as Time magazine noted in naming her Person of the Year. For those on the spectrum, this is a profound moment –…


The pitfalls of remote work, and how to avoid them

By MITCH MAIMAN // Like many companies, IPS is discovering and depending on new ways to work, enabling business to continue during the COVID-19 crisis. For our company, the pivot has been broadly enabled by a few key factors. For one thing, IPS staff members are predominantly “knowledge workers,” meaning the majority of their work already involves modern computing and telecommunications technologies. And the modern telecommunications infrastructure includes ubiquitous broadband communication channels, featuring highly evolved…


Fail to plan, plan to fail: A post-pandemic blueprint

By MICHAEL H. SAHN // We are fighting a great battle against COVID-19. Healthcare providers – the people in the trenches, our heroic first responders – deserve our greatest admiration and deepest respect. But in a very real sense, all of us are on the front lines and exposed to the dangers of this crisis. We will prevail. But the costs will be staggeringly high, in both lives lost and economic damage. To recover, we…


The diversity dilemma: Making good hires look bad

By GREG DEMETRIOU // Major corporations, organizations and institutions make regular announcements when they tick off diversity accomplishments. XYZ Company welcomes its first African American CEO. Acme Corp. elevates a woman to its Board of Directors, first time ever. Widgets Inc. announces its first openly gay chief operations officer. These personnel announcements are plentiful, especially in business publications and their social media counterparts. And there is the smiling face of the newly crowned – forever…


Why Harry S. Truman was the ultimate COO

By TOM MARINER // Last week, I visited the 4-mile-wide dot called Key West at the end of the giant fishhook chain of islands hanging from the bottom of Florida. One of the local attractions in Key West is the Little White House, where Harry S. Truman, the 33rd President of the United States, took the nation’s business when he wanted to get away and think. We took an educational tour with an enthusiastic, knowledgeable…


To slow diseases, smarter environments are going viral

By SAVERIO BELFIORE and THOMAS KING // We send our children off to school every day with the understanding that our school facilities are safe, clean and secure environments. But if we don’t properly maintain these “controlled” environments, they may become examples of “great science experiments.” Students spend up to eight hours a day indoors, with hundreds of other students in close proximity. Children are generally more vulnerable to environmental contaminants than adults, whether it be coronavirus,…


As climates change, a strong case for new land laws

By MICHAEL H. SAHN // We need a new, long-range vision for land-use regulation. The land we are regulating is changing rapidly, and this presents challenges and consequences we are only beginning to understand. Land-use regulations, codified in zoning laws, govern the way land is used and developed. The goal of zoning laws is to carry out a community’s long-range land-use objectives, in accordance with a comprehensive plan – in other words, to make sure…